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Archive for the ‘Taxes’ Category

Saturday was a beautiful spring day in New England. Temperatures were moderate.  No humidity.  It was bright and sunny with languid puffy clouds hanging in the noon time breeze.  A beautiful day to be outside especially after the gloomy weather that Mother Nature has thrown at us during the winter and spring so far. A beautiful day for gathering with family and friends and celebrating the milestones of life whether a birth, a marriage, a graduation or connecting with others.

It so happened that I was attending the funeral celebration for a friend and client. Celebration is the right word.  While sadness always is part of these things, it truly was more fitting and proper to highlight and remember the qualities that we all should aspire to.

In this case we were gathered to celebrate a sister, aunt, daughter and friend who lived fully during her short 50 odd years.  A global traveler, talented cook and baker, gifted woodworker and gardener and charitable sort who always thought of others less fortunate.

Regardless of one’s religious persuasion, the celebrant of this service, a Roman Catholic priest, expressed it best when he said that many of us think a long life is synonymous of a good life.  But in reality, he emphasized, the teachings of many religions focus on the quality of life as opposed to its length. And this person, my friend and the sister of my very best friend, truly made her short time in the temporal world full and rich.

Like a light switch, one moment someone’s vivacious smile is there and in the next instant it is gone leaving us only with the warm glow of memory.  Whether it is better to have a sudden death or have time to prepare for the inevitable is a constant debate.  In this case, my friend was there one moment and in the next she was gone.

Inevitably, when confronted with such sudden tragedy, we tend to think of our own mortality.  I recall after the Twin Towers came down in NYC, how families were drawn closer together even if they didn’t have a direct connection to the victims of the terrorist attack.  And the interest in insurance and estate planning was at a high point.  Lawyer friends reported doing more wills and guardianship plans.  Insurance agents were fielding calls for new insurance policies.

It shouldn’t take a tragedy – whether public or personal – to get people motivated to act in their best interests but we are frail humans and tend to look at the present disregarding the future.

But we do that at our own peril.

Someday is Today

A person with friends is truly rich – remember “It’s a Wonderful Life.” While I truly believe that sentiment, it doesn’t mean abdicating one’s responsibility to care for family and friends by skipping the planning.

It is frustrating to be a financial planner and in trying to deal with such issues receive either blank stares or promises to deal with it later. At other times there is the all-encompassing answer to all: I’m All Set.

  • Someday, I’ll draft a will.
  • Someday, I’ll check my insurance coverage.
  • Someday, I’ll talk to my brother (or sister or friend) about guardianship of the kids.
  • Someday, I’ll deal with all these financial planning issues.

Someday is now.

Planning for the inevitable is not for you.  It is to help others.  It is selfish to think that things will just take of themselves.  Sure, plans will together.  But the stress on the family, friends and loved ones left to deal with picking up the pieces is not something you should burden someone with lightly when taking a few steps will help smooth the transition.

  1. At the very least, get a Will.  You don’t need to be rich to have one of these.  Better yet, make sure you have a Durable Power of Attorney in place so that your financial affairs can be coordinated.
  2. Review and update your Will periodically. Even if you do have a Will doesn’t mean that it still works for you.  Times change and so do tax and estate laws.
  3. Include written instructions.  Do you want to be buried or cremated? Who do you want to have certain sentimental, personal effects?
  4. Have a list of online passwords for your banking and social media accounts in a safe but accessible place.  Without them your heirs will have trouble dealing with some of your financial matters or your social media accounts could possibly be shut off.  And since most of our lives and communications are now so much online, your family might not be able to notify your extended network of your passing unless they can get online.
  5. Review your insurance as part of a comprehensive financial needs analysis regularly.  Too often people simply think that what they have in place covers them regardless of the simple fact that personal circumstances change and dictate changes in coverage.
  6. If you own property and have a mortgage or have young kids who would be raised by someone else when you’re gone, make sure you have insurance that at least covers the bills.  This means having a term insurance policy for at least the balance of the mortgage.  And if you have kids, figure out the costs to raise them (and pay for college maybe) and put a policy in place to equal that.  Otherwise, you may be leaving a spouse, friend, family member or business partner with trying to carry the costs without benefit of the resources.
  7. Check and update the beneficiaries on insurance policies, annuities, company-sponsored 401ks and personal IRAs. Maybe you had a divorce and never updated this so your ex-spouse may be the unintended recipient.  Or new kids, nieces or nephews have been born since the last time you did this.

In my banking and financial planning careers, I have seen both personally and professionally the impact on survivors left behind to pick up the pieces.  There was the client who needed to refinance to help pay for an elder parent’s funeral.  There was the friend who battled bravely against cancer but eventually succumbed leaving behind a wife, a three-year old toddler and a mortgage.

The pain caused by the loss of a loved one doesn’t need to be compounded by the stress, frustration and confusion of having to unexpectedly deal with financial challenges.

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Below is a post from the Boston Tax Institute (May 31, 2011) from Kurt Czarnowski, formerly with the SSA as Regional Communications Director in New England.  Kurt presented to the Merrimack Valley Estate Planners Council, one of my groups a while ago and always had a knack for making the complex and dry information from Social Security enlightening and fun.

Unfortunately, many people do not completely understand how work and earnings impact a person’s ability to collect Social Security retirement benefits. As a result, they may be losing out on monthly payments which are rightfully theirs.

The good news is that the Senior Citizens’ Freedom To Work Act of 2000 eliminated the Social Security annual earnings limitation beginning with the month a person reaches Full Retirement Age (FRA). (From 2000 through 2002, FRA was age 65. However, in 2003, it began increasing, so that FRA is now age 66 for people born between 1943 and 1954.)

This means that if you are at Full Retirement Age or older, and you work, you can receive a full monthly Social Security benefit, no matter how much you earn. In addition, any earnings you may have had prior to the month you reach your FRA do not impact your ability to collect benefits from FRA going forward.

But, if you are under FRA, there is still a limit on how much you can earn and still receive full Social Security benefits. In 2011, the annual limit is $14,160, and if you are younger than full retirement age during all of 2011, you lose $1 in benefits for each $2 you earn above that amount.

If you retire in mid-year, you already may have earned more than the yearly earnings limit, but that doesn’t mean you can’t collect benefits for the remainder of the year. There is a special rule that applies to earnings for one year, usually in the first year of retirement. In 2011, this rule lets you collect a full Social security check for any month your earnings are $1,180 or less, regardless of the yearly earnings total.

It is important to note that if some of your retirement benefits are withheld because of your earnings, these payments are not completely lost. Starting at your full retirement age, your benefit amount will be recalculated, and it will be increased to take into account those months in which payments were withheld.

Retiring? Consider your options and the role of Social Security

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One thing that I will add here is that I have seen first hand the problems that can occur when folks do not understand the rules.

As a registered tax preparer with XtraRefunds, I have had several folks come in to have us prepare their taxes.  They invariably have had false information about Social Security benefits.

I had one case where an individual came to me as a new client.  During the initial intake he failed to answer certain questions. Although he was over age 65, he was still working a full-time job and running a small business on the side.  Only after we had completed the return, did he happen to mention that he was receiving Social Security benefits but he had no paperwork (1099-R or annual benefits statement for instance).

When we finally got the paperwork from SSA and inputted the amounts, his tax status changed considerably from a refund to a liability. This was because a portion of his benefits were taxed.  Not everyone realizes that up to 85% of Social Security benefits can be taxed when you have a gross income above certain levels.

This example stresses the need for having a trusted adviser to work with before you make major money moves instead of relying solely on what friends and relatives might say.

Need help?  Consider a 30-minute free call at 978-388-0020.

Free Phone Consulation on Retirement Issues with a Certified Financial Planner Professional

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Consumers and homeowners in particular tend to think that financial planning is all about investing.  In reality, the key to proper financial planning is making smart moves with your money to protect your hard-earned wealth.  Too often consumers fret about the specific investment’s return and ignore the things that they can control such as how to not lose money.

One of the key parts of a good financial plan is proper estate planning.  And one element of an estate plan is controlling for risks that can wipe out your wealth such as from a lawsuit or a creditor.

To that end the revisions that became effective with the updated Massachusetts Homestead Law will help all homeowners.

New Law in Massachusetts Will Protect Homeowners and Vital for Seniors

As reported in the Boston Tax Institute newsletter of May 31, 2011, the Massachusetts Legislature has enacted a new law that will increase homestead protection for homeowners in Massachusetts. Homestead protects a person’s residence from most creditors. If a homeowner is sued by a creditor or files for bankruptcy, a portion of their equity in their home – the “homestead estate” – is deemed unavailable to their creditors. The new law was passed on December 16, 2010, and became effective on March 16, 2011.

What a homestead exemption does is protect the property against attachment, levy on execution or a court-ordered forced sale to satisfy payment of a debt.

The new law essentially puts in place a minimum amount of coverage for all homeowners (now $125,000) and each homeowner can file the form to gain protection up to the extended amount ($500,000 or $1 million for an elder couple).

Cheap Protection Against Lawsuits or Creditors

This is cheap protection.  And vital for anyone.

Consider this: One lawsuit can not only ruin your day but force you to lose the equity in your home.

If you have teens at home and there is a severe car accident, you can be sued.  If you lose the lawsuit and are assessed a civil judgement by the court, the other party could put a lien on your home or even force the sale of the property to pay the claim.

An elder driver could drive through a wall or onto a sidewalk and cause property damage or personal injury that exceeds their insurance liability coverage.

These are only a couple of examples that could put someone’s home at risk.  This new law at least provides some basic protection and the extended coverage will provide more peace of mind.

Key Updates to the Law

Under the amended Massachusetts Homestead law (Estate of Homestead):

  • Massachusetts homeowners will receive automatic $125,000 protection against debt collectors (if they hold that much equity in their home) without having to do anything.
  • Homeowners can elect to file a homestead declaration with the Registry of Deeds, which will give homeowners up to $500,000 in equity protection from non-exempt creditors.  Homestead forms, or homestead deeds, are filed at the Registry of Deeds in the county in which the residence is located. The filing fee ranges from $35-$100.
  • For married couples, both spouses will now have to sign the form. Before only one spouse signed and protection was only afforded to the spouse who signed.  If a single person declares a homestead and subsequently gets married, the Homestead automatically protects the new spouse.
  • Homesteads now pass on to the surviving spouse and children who live in the home.  The protections also remain for transfers between relatives.
  • There is new protection for homeowners who receive insurance proceeds from fire or other damages.
  • There has always been confusion whether a homeowner had to re-file a homestead after a refinance.  The new law clarifies this issue – homeowners do NOT have to re-file a homestead after a refinance.  Under the new law, Homesteads are automatically subordinate to mortgages, and lenders are specifically prohibited from having borrowers waive or release a homestead.
  • Homesteads are now available for single families, condominiums, coops, manufactured homes and now for 2-4 unit homes; and also for homes that are held in a trust for estate planning or other reasons.
  • Closing attorneys in mortgage transactions must now provide borrowers with a notice of availability of a homestead.
  • There is no need to re-do/re-file an existing homestead under the new law.

The form itself is pretty easy to fill in and file with the registry where your primary residence is located and recorded.  For a $35 registry fee you could get $300,000 in protection from creditors (now up to $500,000).

Special note:  Attorney Ed Adamsky provided a clarification (thanks, Ed):

If you have already filed a homestead, you do not have to update it to get the benefits of the updated Massachusetts law. If you have not filed one, you should do so. In New Hampshire there is nothing to file

For specific guidance on legal issues, speak with a qualified attorney. For help in putting in place a financial plan or road map for your money that looks at all the pieces of your plan, then call a qualified financial planner who can help make sense of all the moving parts regarding your money.

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A key component of a diversified income-oriented portfolio is dividends. This is what I have noted in the past during my presentations, blogs and online musings. They are a key part of a solid retirement income strategy.

The total return from stocks is derived from two key components:  price appreciation and the cash flow from dividends.

Most investors are certainly familiar with the concept of price appreciation (or depreciation as was evident during the financial crisis and Flash Crash for instance).  This is what the media each night focuses on when they report on “The Market.”

But less noticed is the value of dividends to the longer-term success of an investor.

The Value of Dividends to An Investor

Below is a chart of various recent periods of stock market performance compiled by Thornburg Investment.

The “Dividend Aristocrats Index” refers to an index of companies that consistently lead the market in paying dividends and regularly increasing their dividends.

Annualized Total Return Period Dividend Aristocrats Index S&P 500
1990-94 12.58% 10.4%
1995-99 19.48% 28.54%
2000-04 9.79% -2.29%
2005 – 9/2009 2.32% -0.08%
1990 – 9/2009 10.97% 8.41%

Dividend-paying stocks have shown these positive attributes over this period:

  1. Historically higher yields than bonds
  2. Historically higher total returns compared to bonds because of the stock appreciation potential of the dividend-payers.
  3. Higher income, capital appreciation and total return compared to the S&P 500 Index in almost all of the periods noted above and a near 20-year annualized total return of nearly 11% versus 8.4.

Dividend-paying stocks are probably not as sexy as most aspects of the stock market.  They are part of “value investing.” They are the stuff of “conservative” portfolios built for “widows and orphans.”  They are the basic building blocks used by Benjamin Graham, the author of Intelligent Investing and the principles on which Warren Buffet built Berkshire-Hathaway.

But for an income-oriented investor (such as a retiree) looking at ways to manage income in retirement, they should not be overlooked.  In fact, recent research reveals that those companies that pay out higher dividends also tend to have higher stock prices because they also have higher earnings growth. And earnings growth is another key component in valuing stocks.  This research indicates this as a global tendency.

Searching for Yield

Unfortunately, seeking out high dividend-paying companies in the US is not so easy.  Unlike managements of Euro-based companies where paying dividends is a sort of badge of honor, US companies tend to be much more stingy in paying back earnings to owners of the company (the stockholders).

And the trend in dividend yields is one that continues to decline. A research note by Vanguard (May 2011) shows this trend.  From 1928 through 1945, the average dividend yield was around 5.6% and dividends represented about 67% of company earnings (aka dividend payout ratio). From 1945 to 1982 the average yields dropped to 4.2% and the payout ratio to 53%.  In the more recent period from 1983 through 2010, the average dividend yield has dropped to 2.5% with a payout ratio of about 46%.

As you can see finding “Aristocrats” that pay out higher than these averages makes a big difference.  And the higher payouts may also portend higher future earnings as well as stock price appreciation.

But even those companies which are “stingier” will still help out a portfolio.

Do Lower Dividends Mean Lower Stock Prices?

The question that investors may be asking themselves now is “will these lower dividend yields (historically and compared to Europe for instance) be an indicator of lower stock prices?” Because the market’s dividend yield is below its historical norm, is that an indicator of lower total returns in the future?

While the stock market is certainly not without bubbles and crashes, it is unlikely that this is a factor in possible future stock price levels. Lower dividend yields are not necessarily an indicator of lower total returns.

There are other reasons that are more likely the cause of this trend toward lower yield payouts.  Part of this is based on US tax policy.  Another is the culture of US corporate management that has opted toward share repurchases instead.

In the US, there is a bias in favor of long-term capital gains over receiving dividends and paying income taxes.

When dividends are paid out all stock holders receive the income and are subject to tax. When management opts for a “share repurchase” program, only those who tender their shares are paid out.  So this may be more agreeable to investors who are trying to manage their tax bill from investing. For those who are longer-term stock holders, they may receive more favorable capital gains treatment by holding the stock and waiting simply for appreciation.

Admittedly, there may also be an incentive by management not to declare dividends so that they can hold onto the capital to “reinvest” in the business – which may or may not be a good thing.  (The same argument can also be seen in political terms in Washington when both parties are arguing about whether or not to have tax cuts).

And management may also have an incentive to repurchase stock because such programs provide the company with flexibility to change the terms – something that is frowned upon if management were to lower or cancel a declared dividend.

How to Use Dividends in Your Portfolio

In any event, using dividend-paying stock is something that makes sense in retirement portfolios.  To provide tax efficiency, it makes sense to include these in your qualified accounts (like IRAs).  And to boost income, it makes sense to add global dividend-paying stocks which tend to have higher yields and payouts.  Nothing in these current research notes indicates that the lower US yields and payouts are an indicator for lower future stock prices.  There are enough other things going on in the economy locally and globally that can impact do that.

To Build a Better Mousetrap or Get More Information

For more ways to build a retirement income portfolio, please feel free to give me a call directly at 978-388-0020 and stay tuned to the company website for upcoming webinars that will cover this topic too.

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I know that it’s been a while.  And for those who have been dropping by, I appreciate your continued support. Hopefully, others will find their way back and find the fresh perspective enlightening.  In a world of confusion, my mission continues to be to bring to light fresh ideas on how to plan better and wiser for college funding, divorce, retirement and investing.

As I noted in my last post, I became a registered tax preparer and member of the National Association of Tax Professionals.  Through my company Clear View Wealth Advisors, I had acquired the assets and client base of XtraRefunds, an income tax preparation service located in South Lawrence, Massachusetts.

I Survived

My last post was titled “adventures of a tax preparer” and I had hoped to provide some ongoing commentary on how things were going.

Unfortunately, getting the business relocated to new offices, organizing the IT and systems, learning the software and providing tax prep services to walk-in clients took up most of my time leaving me with very little brain power to provide any commentary here.

This has truly been a learning experience.  And I truly believe that it provides me with added tools and perspective to be a better financial adviser to individuals and business owners.

Bringing Financial Planning Services to the Masses

One thing that I had learned as a banker (I was a mortgage banker for more than 18 years you may recall) is the truism of the expression that a bank will gladly lend you money when you don’t really need it.

The same holds true for financial planning.  As a former representative of a wirehouse broker-dealer, I found that everyone wanted to give advice to the very rich and those who are well-off. But more often than not those who had less than some minimum amount of money were shunned and pretty much told “come back when you have more.”

That’s why I formed my financial planning practice as an independent registered investment adviser firm.  People need help at all stages and should not be left out in the cold just because their bank balances don’t have enough zeroes.

This is what I noted on my website and what I truly believe.

So I saw the integration of a tax preparation service as a way to help individuals by being there to offer financial planning tips and services.

Still Working Through the Growing Pains

Time will tell if my ideas in action make sense.

But from the stories that I heard I know that people of all income and education levels can benefit from having access to an objective financial professional who is not going to simply try selling them something.

Cost of Avoiding a Bad Mistake: Priceless

So I created financial plan program options for folks to use like the Advisor-On-Call program: pay one fee for the entire year and get access to me to answer any question on any issue during the year.

I know the need is there. Someone came in to see me and told me about her sister who lost everything when her apartment in Worcester burned down.  She didn’t have any renter’s insurance.  This was  a learning experience and I was able to teach the client why she needed the same type of coverage for herself.

Back in the Saddle

Now that tax season is over and the calendar has turned to spring (despite the weather I see outside my window), I am back on the bike saddle as well.   It’s usually on these long rides I do solo or with my cycling club that I get to clear my head and come up with new topics to write about here in the blog or in my newsletter.

Some of the wisdom that I expect to share with you over the coming weeks:

  • How to build a better retirement income plan using the bucket strategy
  • How to save on the cost of college even if your kid is a senior in high school
  • How to lower the cost of divorce in the long-run by selling the family home
  • How to get better yield outside of a bank money market

Thanks for stopping by and please keep on checking in.

And as always, your comments are greatly appreciated as are any questions or issues or story ideas that you want me to address.

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Lately, the media has been dominated by the compromise on US federal tax policy that has been brokered by President Obama that will lead to an extension of current income tax rates, lower estate and payroll tax rates and an extension of unemployment benefits.  It is very likely to pass almost intact and free up the logjam that has hampered this lame duck session of Congress.

Uneven Recovery

From the point of view of a resident of Main Street, the economy is still ailing.  Consumer demand is still off.  A stubbornly high unemployment rate persists.  Real estate values continue to drop in most markets and at best have settled in at levels not seen in nearly a decade. In general, it’s not a pretty picture.

On the other hand, business profits, productivity and cash (now sitting at about $2 Trillion) are up. And this has been reflected on Wall Street by a healthy rise in most major indices.

So the prescription for getting out of this funk is a familiar one: Low taxes leads to growth.  Sometimes, though, conventional thinking can be dangerous.

Economic Theory

From a purely economic theory point of view, there are really only three participants in the economy who can spur demand and ultimately growth: consumers, businesses or government (at all levels).

With consumer spending hampered by unemployment and nervousness about what assets, income and jobs that they may have, you can’t really expect consumers to be leading us to growth.

While businesses have the cash and the profits, they seem to be in wait-and-see mode “keeping their powder dry.”

So that leaves governments at the local, state and federal level. Unfortunately, most local and state governments don’t have the resources or the legal authority to continue deficit spending so that leaves us dependent on the federal purse to help spur the economy.

Tax Package as Stimulus

The tax package compromise as proposed is not perfect.  Like any piece of legislation, it is a mash-up (though the versions seen on Glee are usually much more fun to watch).  It certainly provides the potential for much-needed economic stimulus.

By putting cash in the pockets of the persistent unemployed, it will help keep households running and bolster their local economies when cash is circulated.  By reducing payroll taxes on those who are working, it will also lead to direct spending in much the same way that the under-reported stealth “middle class tax cut” of 2010 did.

By patching the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) for another year, more than 21 million households were protected from an unexpected hike in their personal tax burden (estimated at around $3,000 to $5,000 for each family) which might have choked off funds available to circulate in the rest of the economy for goods and services.

The big question will be whether the upper income brackets will use their tax breaks on income and estate taxes to pump up the economy.  Certainly, it could help with high-end consumer goods, vacation homes, and furnishings.  But as much as these purchases will help jewelers, real estate agents, car salesmen and clothing retailers, there’s only so many shoes, watches, cars and homes that someone can consume.

Good Politics May Make for A Bad Economy Long-Term

But will this create jobs?  How quickly can an expected $100,000 cut in income taxes for the richest 1% of Americans translate to business investment that creates jobs?  And at the end of the day, does this potential added economic activity keep us on track for growth?

These are the kinds of questions that probably prompted credit analysts at Moody’s Investor Service, a credit rating company, to put out a cautionary note about the possible negative impact on federal finances with its ultimate impact on consumers.

From a purely political point of view, this may be a good deal.  From a short-term economic stimulus point of view, it provides some benefits.  In the long-term, though, there is a real risk that the nation’s strained finances will take a hit to its credit rating leading to higher borrowing costs for the government directly and for all consumers seeking credit as well.

The Rich (And The Government) Are Different

Why?  Well, ask any mortgage borrower.  When you have pristine credit, it’s easier to borrow money at the most favorable rates.  Over the long-term, borrowing $200,000 at 6% will cost you more than borrowing the same amount at 4.5%.

On the other hand, when a borrower’s credit score is lower – even by a little – then the options available can dry up or cost more.

This is what may happen as we move forward and digest the impact of this tax plan.  It ultimately is kicking the can down the road for others to deal with.  The estimated price tag on the plan is between $700-billion and $900-billion to be added on top of a trillion-dollar plus federal deficit. And the proposals for cutting the deficit prompted much gnashing of teeth and proclamations of lines in the sand indicating that there is no likely easy compromise on their recommendations especially in a grid-locked Congress next term.

US Credit Score on Watch List

Is there an immediate problem?  No.  As long as we still have investors who are confident that they will get paid back on the money that they lend us through their purchase of our government’s debt.  Unlike the mortgage borrower in my example, the government can vote to increase its credit limit and authorize the printing of cash. Not something that your typical consumer or state government can do.

And investor’s in the marketplace seem to be OK with that as seen by the cost of insuring against default through derivatives. An insurance contract to protect $13.-million worth of U.S. government debt currently costs €41,000 a year, according to data from credit-information firm Markit Group. That is down from €59,000 in February of this year, and far less than in early 2009, when it cost €100,000.

But this can turn on a dime.  Ask those folks in Greece.  They are painfully aware what can happen when investors and banks lose patience and pull the plug and the credit line.

Yes, Greece is not the US, which has the benefit of being the world’s reserve currency.  But that should not lead us to complacency and hubris.  We need more than conventional thinking and political party maneuvering.  We need the kind of shared sacrifice that the Greatest Generation exhibited which won the peace in a global conflict and pulled us out of the other greatest global economic calamity of the last century.

Either we need to make the tough choices now while we can or we will be forced to pretty much at gunpoint down the road.  That’s not a pretty picture nor a way to grow in the long-term.

Maybe we can get the folks from Glee to work on a musical mash-up of sorts that will make this happen.

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The clock is running out on this session of Congress.  While far from a sure thing, at least there is movement on the tax front.  Whether that movement is progress or a step back will depend on your point of view.

It’s been said many times:  Two things you don’t want to see being made are sausage and legislation.

This go-around with the recently negotiated tax bill is just such an example.  In the spirit of the holidays, there is just about something for everyone in this proposed compromise: tax cut extension, cut in payroll taxes, a fix to the AMT exemption, extension of unemployment benefits.

While the full impact is yet to be digested, it is certain that the debate is far from over.  And it is almost equally certain that in its present form it will likely add considerably to the federal budget deficit.

Since we are still in fragile economic territory, demand stimulus is still needed.  And at least this proposal, while far from perfect, will provide that in the form of funding for unemployment benefits, lower payroll taxes and

Now that there will be “tax certainty” let’s see if the job creation will follow.

I’m happy to see that there is a patch for the AMT so that millions of families won’t be unexpectedly hit by a stealth tax increase.  Unfortunately, a permanent fix of the AMT is not on the radar and we’ll be doing this again next year as well.

And from an estate planning point of view, there will finally be some certainty on this front – at least for now.

While ‘stimulus’ is a bad word, at least there will be some economically beneficial parts to the proposal.  The most direct positive impact on the economy and aggregate demand is having more cash in the hands of average consumers.  On this point, the extension of unemployment benefits, in addition to being just morally right, will put cash in the pockets of millions who will immediately circulate it for payment of needed goods and services – not to mention paying the mortgage to help avert more foreclosures.

I’m no fan of trickle down economics and don’t think that we can afford tax breaks that for the most part will not lead to job creation in the near term.

Now we’ll see how the proposal will fare in Congress.  In any event, let’s hope that the sound you hear in the background is only the clock ticking down to the end of the session and not the timer of a not-t00-distant debt time bomb counting down to a nasty explosion.

 

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