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Posts Tagged ‘Financial Aid’

There are so many choices and ways to pay for college.

Let’s look at an overview.

In general in comes down to this.  Find a school and a program that fits your needs and learning style.  Do whatever you can to limit the amount of time you need to stay on campus. Take advantage of every opportunity to work, get financial aid or qualify for scholarships.

You can reduce the time you’re enrolled by getting advanced placement credit for some courses.  You can do this through testing while still in high school or you can apply for classes at the local college that can possibly transfer to the school you enter.  You should also consider taking classes during summer break to accelerate your graduation date.

For financing, consider this:

  1. Choose a school that offers a great financial aid package: There are database search tools that will provide you with a comparison of the kinds of aid packages available.  You can access one of these tools through the Clear View website here.
  2. Consider a state school: Tuition is lower for instate resident students allowing you to save a bundle. If you like a school’s program but you live out-of-state, consider finding a way to qualify for in state residency.
  3. Work during school and more during the off-season: By working an average of 20 hours per week you can earn enough to cover most books, fees and equipment as well as pizza and beer.
  4. Find scholarships:  Getting someone else to pay for school is a real bonanza. So don’t underestimate the value of searching out scholarships.  Many go unclaimed each year.  You can start your free search at www.scholarships.com or www.collegeboard.com under the “Fund Finder” section.
  5. Consider post-college service programs:  By joining certain community service programs some or all of your student loans may be forgiven.  So consider working in an inner city neighborhood program like CityYear or teach.
  6. Borrow if you have to:  While Shakespeare said “neither a borrower nor lender be,” sometimes you can’t avoid it. So here your options are many and varied.  Over 71% of college aid comes in the form of loans.  To navigate your way through this contact a qualified financial planner who can help.

If you follow these steps, you can minimize the amount of debt you or your student will be burdened by.  And your retirement nest egg will remain intact as well.

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As noted in previous articles and posts, whether or not your student qualifies for federal financial aid for college will depend on the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) calculation.

Typically, almost all assets and income are included in this calculation by financial aid officers.  There are exceptions to all rules and in this case, federal aid formulas (under the “Federal Methodology”) exclude home or family farm equity, money accumulated in tax-deferred retirement accounts and cash value built up in a life insurance policy.  The cash values of fixed and variable annuities are also excluded.

Since these assets are not counted in determining aid, some families may be tempted to consider “asset shifting” strategies.  With such techniques, a countable asset like savings or investments through a brokerage account are used to acquire one or more of these other non-countable asset types.

Friends and clients have attended financial aid workshops sponsored by college aid planners or insurance agents who recommend purchasing annuities or life insurance.  Sometimes these strategies involve doing a “cash out” refinance or drawing on a home equity line of credit. Tapping home equity to fund a deposit into an insurance or annuity vehicle may benefit a mortgage banker and insurance agent but is it in your best interests?

Asset Shifting to Qualify for More Financial Aid: Is it worth it?

Well, that depends on what side of the table you’re sitting on.

Yes, it’s true that anything you can do to reduce your expected family contribution may help boost the amount and type of aid your student may receive.

On the other hand, remember these points:

  • Family assets are counted at a low contribution rate of 5.6% above the asset-protection allowance calculated for your family circumstances.
  • If you put money into a tax-deferred account, it’s locked up.  Access to the funds before age 59 1/2 results in early withdrawal penalties in most cases.
  • You may have to pay to borrow your own money.

Granted, socking away money into tax-deferred vehicles may make sense for you.  And as I’ve noted before, paying for college is as much a retirement problem as anything else so anything you can do to provide for your Golden Years can be a good thing.

But don’t get tempted into long-term commitments to cover short-term financing issues.

By shifting assets you lose access and flexibility for the cash.  If employing such a strategy reduces your emergency cash reserve, then you’ve increased your risk to handle unexpected cash needs.

Cash Value Life Insurance and the Bank of You

Cash value life insurance accumulates its value over time.  Starting a policy within a couple of years of your student’s college enrollment is not going to help you.  During the initial years of such a policy very little cash is built up as insurance expenses and first-year commissions paid out by the insurer to the agent are very high which limit the amount of paid premiums that are actually invested for growth.

But consider this:  For some who have existing policies or are looking for a way to build cash over time that offers guarantees and is potentially tax-free, then by all means use life insurance.  There are strategies commonly referred to as the Infinite Banking Concept or the Bank of You which champion life insurance as a way to build and access your own pot of money available to you to borrow for almost any purpose.

There are many attributes to life insurance that make these concepts useful

  • Tax-free dividends,
  • Access to money without credit or income qualifications or delays from a traditional bank,
  • Guarantees on the cash value from the insurer.

But one downside is the cash flow needed to actually build up a pot big enough to tap into for buying a car much less paying school tuition.  You would in all likelihood need to divert all other available cash and stop funding any other tax-deferred plans to build up the cash.  And then there is the time line needed.  To effectively build up the cash, you really need to bank on at least 5 years before you have a Bank of You to tap. This is why such a solution is not recommended for those with students about to enter college.

Bottom Line:

Don’t let the financial aid tail wag the retirement planning dog here.  Only use these tactics after consultation with a qualified financial professional, preferably one who has no vested interest in whether or not you purchase a particular product.

 

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It’s never too early or even too late to start planning for ways to pay for college or post-graduate school.

Myths

There are a number of myths out there that can adversely impact your planning efforts:

1.) There’s not enough aid available;

2.) Only students with good grades get aid;

3.) My family makes too much money to qualify.

Reality

In reality, both “self-help” aid like loans and “gift” aid like grants and scholarships are available.  To increase your odds for getting your share there are a number of education-oriented and tax-oriented strategies you can use.

Some Tips When Applying for Financial Aid:

  • Fund Your Retirement— “Federal method” for calculating need usually does not consider retirement assets so put as much as you can into these accounts.
  • Reduce Assets Held in the Student’s Name—Parental assets are assessed at a lower rat: So buy the computer, dorm furniture or car in the base year (the year before filing the FAFSA) out of your student’s savings accounts.
  • Avoid Cash Gifts to Students—It’s Better for Grandma to Pay the School Directly: If you’re not qualifying for aid, at least it may help out her tax planning.  Better yet, take out the loans which are deferred until graduation and then let grandma help pay them.  This way you maximize your student aid without having grandma’s help count against the student.
  • Employ Your Child in Your Business and Use the Income to Fund a Roth IRA. The earnings won’t be subject to some of the typical payroll taxes because you’re employing family (restrictions apply) and by stashing it into the Roth, you’re building up a pot of money that can be withdrawn without tax penalty when used for qualified education expenses as long as the account has been open 5 years.

 

For more tips and help, consider using a qualified College Aid Planner like a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (TM) professional.

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Do you own investment real estate or a business? Have you been considering buying a rental property or starting a business? Have kids going to college in a few years?

If you already plan on your kids going to college, it’s never too late to start planning effective and efficient ways to increase savings, lower your taxes and improve your odds for receiving student financial aid.

Let’s say you already give your children an allowance. You’re already paying out of pocket and not getting any tax benefit. With a few changes you can turn that cash outflow into a tax deductible expense that can even help your kids save for college.

Consider hiring them to work in your business or on the rental property you own.

By paying them a reasonable wage for services like landscaping, cleaning, painting, shoveling snow or doing office administrative work like filing, stuffing envelopes or printing marketing flyers, you have an additional deductible expense which lowers the net income or increases the net loss of your business or property.

And for children earning income in the family business, there is no requirement for payroll taxes. And if you keep the amount of “earned” income below certain limits, you won’t be at risk of paying any “kiddie” tax either. (“Kiddie” tax limits adjust for inflation each year).

In effect, you have shifted income from a taxpayer with a higher tax rate to a low- or no-income tax paying child.

Now get your child to open a Roth IRA with the money you pay them and they have the added benefit of tax-free saving for college since Roth IRAs can be tapped for college tuition without paying a penalty as long as the Roth is open for at least five years (restrictions apply).

By reducing your income, you can also reduce your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) which is the critical number used to determine the amount and kind of student financial aid your child can get for college. The EFC is calculated using a number of things including the amount and type of parental assets as well as reported income. EFC is recalculated each time a financial aid form is submitted and is based on the assets and income from the year before.

So to improve your odds for financial aid, one strategy is to lower your reported income. By employing your child to lower your business or rental property income, you may be able to lower your EFC and improve the amount of aid your child receives.

About Steve Stanganelli, CFP ®

Steven Stanganelli, CRPC®, CFP® is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER ™ Professional and a CHARTERED RETIREMENT PLANNING COUNSELOR (sm) with Quest Financial, an independent fee-only financial planning and investment advisory firm with corporate offices in Lynnfield, Massachusetts and satellite locations in Woburn and Amesbury.

Steve is a five-star rated, board-certified financial planning professional offering specialized financial consulting advice on investments, college planning, divorce settlements and retirement income planning using alternatives like self-directed IRAs.

For more information on financial planning strategies, call Steve at 888-323-3456.

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PAYING FOR COLLEGE.

 

 

Do you own a business (full time or part-time)?  Do you own investment real estate or a farm?

 

Would you be interested in learning how to use IRS rules to help you pay for college?

 

If you want to find ways to pay for college without ruining your personal retirement, there is hope (and it’s not just the renames tax credit mentioned below).

 

In this series, we’ll go over the various strategies available to help parents explore the various possibilities to reduce taxes and improve the odds for receiving financial aid, grants or scholarships.  (Consider this: There are more than 110 different strategies.)

 

Food for thought: 

 

  • Encourage your pre-teen to open a Roth IRA with earnings from their paper route or other jobs.
  • Consider hiring your child to work in your business or help with chores related to your investment property.
  • Use a CollegeSure CD issued by an FDIC-insured bank to accumulate savings
  • Think about using a fixed income annuity to hold a portion of money for college to avoid the potential loss in principal that can happen with a 529 plan invested in mutual funds.

Tax Tips:

 

The Hope education credit is renamed the “American Opportunity Tax Credit,” is increased to $2,500, and applies to four years of

college, not just the first two. In addition, 40% of the credit is now refundable. Income limits apply.

 

Another break for those paying higher education expenses: In 2009 and 2010, funds in Section 529 college plans can be used tax-free to pay for

students’ computers, computer technology, and Internet fees.

 

For more information on this topic, continue to check out this blog as well as the weekly Wedesnday night conference call series.

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