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Posts Tagged ‘recession’

Girish asks, “I have heard people talk about ‘taking advantage of’ or ‘minting money from’ a recession. How does one do it?”

If you have cash you can find great bargains in almost any market or asset class – whether it is a stock, bond, mutual fund, buying tax liens or judgments or even real estate.  This is the classic sort of value investing espoused by Benjamin Graham and practiced masterfully by Warren Buffet.

Certainly, when stock prices are down you can pick up shares in companies with strong brands, franchises, marketing and cash flow but which may be temporarily out of favor because of investor fear.  This is certainly what happened during the Great Financial Meltdown.  Those who had the stomach for it and the cash to back it up could buy up many companies at bargain prices.

The key is having the cash and not being over-leveraged. There are lots of stories (most recently in BusinessWeek) about developers who are mortgaged to the hilt and unable to maneuver now as they are caught in a foreclosure squeeze.   Liquidity is really the key to crises.

If you have the cash and the stomach for the risks, you can buy into distressed areas of the market: tax liens, providing capital as a loan with equity kicker to an operating business that may be short of cash because banks are too timid to lend, real estate to fix up and rent (and later on use as a vacation property if you properly structure a 1031 exchange for example.

Some of these tactics can be done with non-qualified money. But one can even consider doing it through a self-directed IRA. Not every custodian is set up to allow this but there are some specialized non-bank custodians that will help set up such accounts. (One such custodian is PENSCO Trust). And the income that may be generated can be tax deferred allowing for more capital to be available for investment or to compound longer.

This is not a substitute for a broadly diversified investment portfolio but a supplement; you could call it the “opportunity” or “tactical” bucket.

The key is cash and an understanding of your personal risk profile. And most require a time horizon longer than a typical day trader’s.

Sure, the key to investing success is to buy almost anything low and sell it higher later.  But don’t limit yourself to just stocks.  There are opportunities beyond just stocks where astute and risk-tolerant investors can take advantage of what arbitrageurs call “information asymmetries.” And they may even be in your local market.

This is where a good financial adviser can help.

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The market’s are jumpy to say the least right now.  As I post this the market has ended four days down in a row after finishing August up 3.5% and up 45% since March. 

Despite signs of ‘green shoots’ and glimmers of positive economic activity, the US stock markets have ended the summer rally with a selloff of over 2% (on the DJIA Index).  Fears of a stock market correction or a “W”-shaped recovery loom large after several months of impressive gains.

Manufacturing activity in the US and Europe are mostly up.  Large money-center banks have been paying back the US Treasury for the money borrowed as part of their bailout.  US auto manufacturers are rehiring.

Yet fears that the mighty economic engine of China may slow coupled with worries about the commercial real estate sector in the US have lead investors to take cover.

What’s an investor to do?  Buy and Hold. Or is buy and hold dead as some commentators say?  What about diversification which really seemed to not protect anyone from the steep dive in all markets and all asset classes?

I personally believe that it’s important to follow the time-tested wisdom of grandma:  Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.

But diversifying doesn’t mean “set it and forget it” either which is typical among investors.

To all things there is a season.  And farmers planting crops and fisherman at sea all know that there are cycles in nature.  (El Nino, anyone?)

So why wouldn’t you expect there to be cycles in markets as well?

Considering that stock and bond markets reflect the collective expectations and emotions of millions of investors, it’s an easy leap to expect markets to be governed by cycles in the cumulative raw emotions as well as considered opinions of its many participants.

Example: Right now small-cap stocks have paid off big time this year.  According to the WSJ, stocks in the S&P Small Cap 600 index have leaped over 66% and midcap stocks are up nearly 62%, far outpacing the S&P 500 large cap index which gained “only” 51%.

What a typical investor will do upon hearing such performance will be to move money into this hot sector of the market. And of course that has been exactly what investors have done as more than $7.5 Billion of all fund flows have been to small-cap mutual funds versus outflows of $18.5 Billion from large-cap funds. What’s that saying about “when fool’s rush in?” 

This being said, there are ways to combine investment approaches.

Instead of “buy and hold” it’s time to consider “sit on it and rotate.” 

Ideally, we all want to a perfect investment that always goes up and never goes down.  But a look at one of those “periodic table” of investment returns shows, rarely does the same sector that was a top performer one year do a repeat the following year.

There is a way to get off the wild roller coaster ride between “gloom and doom” and “irrational exuberance.”

This is what I refer to as a “skill-weighted” portfolio.  Essentially, this approach combines various investments in different assets with different investment approaches to help reduce the roller coaster ride.

Even a nesting hen that is sitting on its eggs will rotate positions every once in a while.  And through this approach, too, an investor will maintain a watchful eye on his portfolio being positioned for opportunities by rotating between and among investments, sectors and trends.

Think of a house: a foundation, a frame and then all the visually appealing touches.

In this approach, an investor will have a core foundation comprised of index type investments (mutual funds or Exchange Traded Funds) with a frame consisting of actively managed mutual funds and topped off with a trend-following program for stocks and/or other Exchange Traded Funds to accent the portfolio.  The combination of all these elements will provide balance which helps reduce overall volatility while still positioning for opportunities.

Consider this:  If an investor owns and holds onto an index, he’ll get 100% of the upside … and 100% of the downside.  If an investor owns all actively managed mutual funds, more than 80% do not beat their benchmark.  And those who “market time” need to be right two times:  when they sell and then when they buy.

Not all approaches work all the time but by combining them (rotating between them) an investor may have a better opportunity to preserve, protect and ultimately profit.

What should matter most to any investor is not beating an individual benchmark but getting where they want to go with as few bumps as possible.

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