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Posts Tagged ‘Retirement Planing’

It’s easy to get tripped up in retirement.  I’m reminded of the expression by the octogenarian to the recent newlywed fretting about life but rejecting out of hand the advice of his experienced senior:

A long time ago I was where you are now.  And later you’ll be where I am now.  But just as you haven’t been your age before, I’ve never been old before.

So for new retirees who “not been there or done that” it’s a whole new world filled with possibility and pitfalls.

Transitioning

Most retirees have an imperfect vision of retirement at best.  And if it hasn’t been discussed or communicated, it could be vastly different from that of your spouse.

Finding meaning in a post-work world can be a real challenge.  If your identity has been wrapped up in what you do, then you might now feel lost.  Your social networks might change.  Your activities might change.

It’s important to reassess your values and envision how you want to live in this next chapter of your life.

Initially, there may be more travel to visit family, friends or places.  You may want to tackle that “bucket list.”

But to live a truly fulfilling and rewarding retirement may require you to take stock in yourself, your values and what gives you meaning.  You may benefit from working with a professional transition coach or group that can help guide you through this period of rediscovery.  One such resource can be found here at the Successful Transition Planning Institute.

Lifestyle Budget

Typically, most retirees may take the rule of thumb bandied about that you will need from 60% to 70% of your pre-retirement income to live on in a post-retirement world.  This is because it is assumed that many expenses will drop off:  business wardrobe, commuting to work, professional memberships, housing, new cars, etc.

The reality is far different.  According to research conducted by the Fidelity Research Institute 2007 Retirement Index, more than two-thirds of retirees spent the same or higher in retirement.  Only eight percent spend significantly lower and about 25% spend somewhat lower. The Employee Benefit Research Institute  reported in its 2010 Retirement Confidence Survey that while 60% of workers expected to more than half of retirees didn’t see a drop in retirement expenditures while 26% of this group reported that their spending actually rose.

It all depends on your goals, lifestyle and what curve balls life throws at you.  If you have adult children who end up in a financial crisis of their own caused by job loss, health issues or divorce, you may be spending more than you expected to help out. Maybe the home you live in will require higher outlays for maintenance or to upgrade the home so you can live there independently. In reality all of that travel and doing things on your bucket list will cost money, too.  So it’s more the rule than the exception to expect spending to increase while you’re still healthy to get up and go.

Over time, the travel bug and other activities will probably decline but even after that these may be replaced by other expenses.

Healthcare

There is an old saying that as you get older you have more doctors than friends.  This is a sad reality for many including my parents.

My father is on dialysis and has complications from diabetes.  His treatments probably cost Medicare (and ultimately the US taxpayer) more than $30,000 each quarter as I figure it.  He takes about 13 prescriptions each day and enters the dreaded “donut hole” about mid-year each year. At one time their former employers (a Fortune 500 company) provided medical insurance benefits to retirees but that became more and more cost prohibitive for their employer and for my parents as premiums, co-pays and deductibles rose.  So now they rely on a combination of Medicare and Blue Cross/Blue Shield and a state program called Prescription Advantage.

As private employers and cash-strapped state and municipal governments tackle the issue, you can expect to pay more for your health care in retirement.

Wealth Illusion

It’s not uncommon to feel really rich when you look at your retirement account statements.  (Sure, the balances are off where they may have been at the peak but it’s probably still a large pot of money). The big problem is that retirees may have no comprehension about how long that pot of money will last or how to turn it into a steady paycheck for retirement.

In reality the $500,000 in your 401k or IRA accounts may only provide $20,000 per year if you plan on withdrawing no more than 4% of the account’s balance each year. Then again if you take out more early on in retirement, you could be at risk of depleting your resources quickly.

Misplaced Risk Aversion & The Impact of Inflation

So as you get older, you’ll be tempted to follow the rule of thumb that more of your investments need to be in bonds. Although this may seem to be a conservative approach to investing, it is in fact risky.

Setting aside that this ignores the risks that bonds themselves carry, it is ignoring the simple fact that inflation eats away at your purchasing power.  Even in a tame inflationary world with 1% annual inflation, a couple spending about $80,000 a year when they are 65 will need over $88,000 a year just to buy the same level of goods and services when they turn 75.  Given the potential for higher inflation in the future that may result from a growing economy and/or current monetary policy, investments need to be positioned to hedge against inflation with a diverse allocation into stocks and not just bonds even when in retirement.

The other risk is trying to play catch up.  As a retiree sees the balances on his accounts get drawn down, he might even be tempted to “shoot for the moon” by investing in illiquid investments like stocks in small, thinly traded markets or in sectors that are very speculative.

Ball games are one by base hits and consistency on the field and at the plate.  Home runs are dramatic but not a sure thing.

Underestimating How Long You’ll Live

We all want a long and productive life.  Many will even say that they don’t want to live to be a burden to their families.  But here again the reality is that most folks do a bad job of guessing how long they’ll live.  A report by the Society of Actuaries notes that 29% of retirees and pre-retirees estimate that they’ll outline the averages but in fact there is a 50% chance of outliving them.

So while they may have enough resources to carry them through the average life expectancy, they will not have enough when they live longer than the averages. And if a couple attains the age of 65, there is a better than 50% chance that at least one of them will live into their 90s.

Given the fact that most women become widows at the age of 53 (Journal of Financial Planning, Nov. 2010), this has a big impact on the availability of resources for retirement.  Too often, a short-sighted approach to maximize current retirement income from a pension is to choose the option that pays the highest but stops when one spouse dies. All too often this puts the widow who may live longer without a reliable source of income to provide for her.

Conclusion

Too often people underestimate how long they will live in retirement, how much they will actually need for living in retirement and how to invest for a sustainable retirement paycheck using appropriate product, asset and tax diversification.

Many people do not save enough for their own retirement.  The social safety net providing support for old age income and healthcare may not be enough to maintain a desired lifestyle.  Women need to understand the risk of living long into retirement and manage resources accordingly.  And because more than 40% of Americans are at risk of retiring earlier than expected because of job loss, family care needs or personal health, there is a real need for proper planning to address these issues.

While retirees will benefit from having a good plan and road map before the final paycheck ends, it’s never too late to start. And for the newly retired with the time to address these issues, now’s as good a time as any to speak to a qualified professional who can help.

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It’s natural for investors who are still skittish after a decade-long roller coaster ride with the stock market and plummeting real estate values to be risk averse and seek out investment alternatives for protecting their nest eggs for retirement, college funding or simply their emergency cash.

And where there is demand, there will be supply.  So naturally, financial firms will design products geared toward satisfying this demand.

One such product that’s getting more attention recently are Market Linked Certificates of Deposit (CDs).

These are in essence a savings product designed to provide a minimum guaranteed interest rate plus the opportunity to increase the return by linking to the return of a specific market index or in some cases an index for inflation.

Such products are part of the larger class of “structured products” produced by investment banks that can come in many flavors and various strategies:  reverse-convertibles, principal-protected notes, Exchange Traded Notes.  They essentially are debt bundled with a derivative and marketed as a way to bet on stocks and interest rates as a way to manage certain risks. All offer in one package strategies using some sort of derivative and may offer a combination of principal protection, risk reduction and/or enhanced returns.

Recent surveys of more than 17 brokerage firms and more than 38 million investors show that most of these products are used by those with under $500,000 in investable assets.  For those with assets between $250,000 and $500,000, about 1.5% of their assets are placed in such products which is slightly higher than the 1.33% of assets for those with under $250,000 to invest.  (Investment News, 11/15/2010, page 52).

More than $70 billion of such products are held by investors with more than $42 billion bought in 2010 according to Bloomberg data.  And given continued uncertainty about the markets, the demand looks like it will not be abating any time soon especially as financial marketing organizations use investor fears as a selling point. Brokers and banks often receive higher fees and commissions for selling such products.

Keith Styrcula of the Structured Products Association said in a recent interview “these kinds of investments have become so attractive because people can no longer trust stock market indexes to go up.” He added that “there’s a lot of fear in the market right now, and a lot of investors don’t just want one-way exposure anymore.”  (Investment News, 11/15/2010, page 51).

But even though these products are marketed as a way to reduce risk they are not risk free.  There is no free lunch and this is no exception. Such products are subject to liquidity risk, market risk, credit risk and opportunity costs.

Market-Linked CDs are a form of principal-protected note offered by an investment bank.  These are not your Grandmother’s bank CDs.  First, such notes are offered as debt of the sponsoring institution so there is always the potential of credit risk.  Think of Lehman Brothers which was a large producer of such notes.  If the issuing firm fails, as Lehman did, the investment is at risk. While there is FDIC-protection on the principal, that may be small comfort when dealing with the time frame to get access to your money through a FDIC claim process.

They may involve a complex strategy which may be buried in the details of the offering’s prospectus.  For market-linked CDs, for instance, the issuer offers the downside protection by managing a portfolio of Treasury bonds (like zero coupon bonds to meet the projected maturity date of the CD).  The upside potential that is offered comes from investing in the bond yield through various strategies.

In such a low interest rate environment, these notes work only if provided sufficient time for the issuer to implement its strategies.  This is one reason that such CDs typically have long lock up periods that can be five years or more.

An issuer may guarantee a minimum interest amount but this is typically not FDIC-insured.  And this is really an obligation of the issuer so that’s where the credit risk comes into play. And you should note that the minimum guarantee usually only applies when the investment is held to maturity.  An investor will lose this guarantee by redeeming before the contract maturity date. And because of the nature of these products, there really is no secondary market around to allow someone else to buy you out early.

The upside potential is calculated based on the performance of the index chosen.  The CD investor does not own the index or the stocks in the index.  The issuer uses its money to invest and potentially reap the dividends issued as well as the appreciation.

What the issuer offers to the CD investor is a certain percentage of the upside gain of the index (called a participation rate) but limited by a ceiling (called a cap).  This calculation of the gain can be convoluted for an investor to understand. While it’s pretty simple to understand a typical CD (put $1000 in at an annual interest rate of 3% means you have $1,030 at end of the period), the same is not true for market linked CDs.

Your gain may be based on an average (so now the question is how are they calculating that average: monthly,  semi-annually, annually, term of the CD) or a Point-to-Point calculation. (Example: If the market index is 1000 when the account opened, went up to 2000 after one year but drops to 1050 by the maturity date, then the point-to-point is from 1000 to 1050 or 5% in this case).

In many ways these are similar to other structured products like market linked annuities (sometimes referred to as index annuities or equity-indexed annuities).

I addressed many of the same issues about calculating returns and possible risks in a post on the subject a while back.

Bottom Line:

Whether or not such products make sense for your personal portfolio really requires a good, long chat with a qualified financial professional. Like any other investment, the potential risks and opportunity costs need to be weighed against your personal goals, time frame, liquidity needs and the potential offered by other alternative options.

So if you are considering such products, just be aware of all the risks and look beyond the marketing brochure at the local bank.

Resources:

SEC Investor Education on Market-Linked CDs

MoneyLinkPro Blog Post on Market Index Annuities

Wikipedia Definition

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Recent academic research by Gordon Pye on the impact of emergency withdrawals on retirement planning may put into question the rule of thumb used by many advisers to determine a safe, sustainable withdrawal rate.

For many investors and their financial advisers, the accepted rule of thumb has been to withdraw no more than 4% of an investment portfolio in any given year to provide a sustainable income stream when in retirement.

Is this rule of thumb reasonable given the potential impact of personal emergencies?  And how can a withdrawal strategy be created to account for them and the impact of external forces like a market correction or longer bear market?

Cloudy Crystal Ball

Analytical tools and software have come a long way but even contemporary tools can’t account for everything.

I spoke with an estate attorney the other day.  We were talking about the many challenges for helping clients plan properly for contingencies in the face of so many internal and external variables.

What he said is worth keeping in mind when thinking about any sort of financial planning:  If you tell me when you’re going to die, I can prepare a perfect estate plan for you?

The same sentiment can be adapted for retirement income planning.  Sure, if you tell me how long you’ll live in retirement, how much it will cost each year and when you’re going to die, I can tell you how much you’ll need.

In reality, this is unlikely.  More often than not, the crystal ball is cloudy. So you have two choices here: Wing it or Plan.

Winging it is pretty simple. Nothing complicated.  Simply keep shuffling along. Sometimes you’ll scramble. Other times you’ll be “fat and happy” for lack of a better phrase.

Planning, on the other hand, is a lot like work.  It requires assumptions and conversations.  It may even require bringing in others to help create the framework.

While nobody wants another job to do given an already busy day, there is an upside to investing the time here: Peace of mind.

What the Doctor Says:

Here’s a summary of what Dr. Pye wrote recently in his article.

  • In retirement, you may never have an emergency or you may have one or more.
  • The timing and extent of these emergencies is unknown.
  • While a retiree may be able to reduce the damage caused by a bear market maybe through market growth, other emergencies may require withdrawals that siphon money away from the investment pot that can never again be used to help repair the hole left by that withdrawal.
  • The timing of these emergency withdrawals may cause a retiree to abandon a market strategy at an inopportune time.

The biggest unknown?  Health care is the biggest likely emergency on your retirement budget.  These can be related to your own health or even an adult son or daughter.  Other emergencies may be caused by catastrophic weather (mudslide, wind or flood damage to your home), the extended loss of a job by a son or daughter or a divorce compelling you to help out.

In other research by Dr. John Harris supports the notion that what matters most to all investors – and retirees in particular – is the sequence of returns not simply the average rate of return on a portfolio.

Intuitively, we understand this.  A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.  Cash now is better than cash later (which may be a deterrent against planning now for a future need).  If you were to just retire and the market takes a nosedive as you are withdrawing funds, you would be in tough shape because you have a smaller base that is invested that has to do double (or triple) duty.  The amount of appreciation needed to make up for the hole left by the withdrawals combined with market losses would be near impossible or require an investor to take imprudent risks to try to regain lost ground.

So what’s an investor to do?

  1. Save more – easier said than done but this is really key or otherwise choose a different lifestyle budget.
  2. Reduce initial withdrawal rates from 4% to 3%.
  3. Follow an “endowment spending” policy instead of a simple rule of thumb.
  4. Invest for income from multiple sources (dividend-paying stocks as well as bonds).
  5. Stay invested in the stock market but change up the players.  Not even a championship ball club has the same line up from game to game.  As markets change, you need to add more tactical plays into the mix of asset types
  6. Separate your investments into different buckets:  short-term lifestyle budget, medium-term and longer-term.  Each of these can have different risk characteristics.
  7. Keep a safety net of near-cash to cover lifestyle needs for 1 to 2 years.
  8. Monitor the buckets so that one doesn’t get too low or start to overflow.  This will require moving funds from one to the other to maintain consistency with the targets.
  9. Don’t let your insurances lapse.  Insurance is there to fill in the gap so you don’t have to shell money out-of-pocket.  Here you want to regularly recheck your homeowner coverage for inflation protection riders, cost of replacement and liability.  Check your coverage and deductible limits for wind, sump pump and other damage.

 

 

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As noted in previous articles and posts, whether or not your student qualifies for federal financial aid for college will depend on the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) calculation.

Typically, almost all assets and income are included in this calculation by financial aid officers.  There are exceptions to all rules and in this case, federal aid formulas (under the “Federal Methodology”) exclude home or family farm equity, money accumulated in tax-deferred retirement accounts and cash value built up in a life insurance policy.  The cash values of fixed and variable annuities are also excluded.

Since these assets are not counted in determining aid, some families may be tempted to consider “asset shifting” strategies.  With such techniques, a countable asset like savings or investments through a brokerage account are used to acquire one or more of these other non-countable asset types.

Friends and clients have attended financial aid workshops sponsored by college aid planners or insurance agents who recommend purchasing annuities or life insurance.  Sometimes these strategies involve doing a “cash out” refinance or drawing on a home equity line of credit. Tapping home equity to fund a deposit into an insurance or annuity vehicle may benefit a mortgage banker and insurance agent but is it in your best interests?

Asset Shifting to Qualify for More Financial Aid: Is it worth it?

Well, that depends on what side of the table you’re sitting on.

Yes, it’s true that anything you can do to reduce your expected family contribution may help boost the amount and type of aid your student may receive.

On the other hand, remember these points:

  • Family assets are counted at a low contribution rate of 5.6% above the asset-protection allowance calculated for your family circumstances.
  • If you put money into a tax-deferred account, it’s locked up.  Access to the funds before age 59 1/2 results in early withdrawal penalties in most cases.
  • You may have to pay to borrow your own money.

Granted, socking away money into tax-deferred vehicles may make sense for you.  And as I’ve noted before, paying for college is as much a retirement problem as anything else so anything you can do to provide for your Golden Years can be a good thing.

But don’t get tempted into long-term commitments to cover short-term financing issues.

By shifting assets you lose access and flexibility for the cash.  If employing such a strategy reduces your emergency cash reserve, then you’ve increased your risk to handle unexpected cash needs.

Cash Value Life Insurance and the Bank of You

Cash value life insurance accumulates its value over time.  Starting a policy within a couple of years of your student’s college enrollment is not going to help you.  During the initial years of such a policy very little cash is built up as insurance expenses and first-year commissions paid out by the insurer to the agent are very high which limit the amount of paid premiums that are actually invested for growth.

But consider this:  For some who have existing policies or are looking for a way to build cash over time that offers guarantees and is potentially tax-free, then by all means use life insurance.  There are strategies commonly referred to as the Infinite Banking Concept or the Bank of You which champion life insurance as a way to build and access your own pot of money available to you to borrow for almost any purpose.

There are many attributes to life insurance that make these concepts useful

  • Tax-free dividends,
  • Access to money without credit or income qualifications or delays from a traditional bank,
  • Guarantees on the cash value from the insurer.

But one downside is the cash flow needed to actually build up a pot big enough to tap into for buying a car much less paying school tuition.  You would in all likelihood need to divert all other available cash and stop funding any other tax-deferred plans to build up the cash.  And then there is the time line needed.  To effectively build up the cash, you really need to bank on at least 5 years before you have a Bank of You to tap. This is why such a solution is not recommended for those with students about to enter college.

Bottom Line:

Don’t let the financial aid tail wag the retirement planning dog here.  Only use these tactics after consultation with a qualified financial professional, preferably one who has no vested interest in whether or not you purchase a particular product.

 

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“The safest way to double your money is to fold it over once and put it in your pocket.” Kin Hubbard

Investing takes time.  As humans our brains are more wired toward the flight-or-flight survival responses that got us to the top of the food chain.  So we are more prone to panic moves in one direction or another and this is not always in our best long-term interests.

So to retire richer requires a little work on understanding who we are and what we can do to improve our sustainable retirement odds.

There are lots of things in life that we cannot control.  And humans in general are easily driven to distraction. We are busy texting, emailing, surfing the web, and all other manner of techno-gadget interruptions from phone, computer and office equipment around us.

It’s no wonder that folks find it difficult to focus on long-term planning.  We hear a snippet of news on the radio or watch a talking head wildly flailing his arms about one stock or another and think that this is the ticket to investing success.

For those who remember physics class and one of Newton’s great discoveries, you can just as easily apply the rules of the physical world to human financial behavior:  A body at rest will tend to stay at rest; a body in motion will tend to stay in motion.

For most investors, inertia is the dominant theme that controls financial action or inaction.  Confronted with conflicting or incomplete information, most people will tend to procrastinate about making a commitment to one plan or another, one action or another.  Even once a course of action is adopted, we’re more likely than not to leave things on auto-pilot because of a lack of time or fear of making a wrong move.

To get us to move on anything, there has to be a lot of effort.  But once a tipping point is reached, people move but not always in the direction that may be in their best interests. Is it any wonder that most people end up being tossed between the two greatest motivators of action – and investing:  Greed and Fear.

So while someone cannot control the weather (unless you remember the old story line from the daytime soap General Hospital in the 1980s), the direction of a stock index or the value of a specific stock, we can all control our emotions.

Easier said than done?  You bet.  That’s why you need to approach investing for retirement or any financial goal with a process that helps take the emotional element out of it.  And you need to develop good habits about saving, debt and investment decisions.

What Does Rich Mean To You?

So you say you want to retire rich?  Sure, we all want to.  But what does “rich” look like to you.  There are surveys of folks who have $500,000 or $1million in investable assets describing themselves as middle class.  There are those I know who live quite comfortably on under $30,000 a year and would never describe themselves as poor.

Be Specific

First you should get a good picture of where you expect to be and what kind of life you envision.  Be clear about it.  Visualize it and then go find a picture you can hang up in a prominent place to remind you of your goal every day.  (That’s why I have pictures of my family on this blog reminding me of why I do everything I do).

Appeal to Your Competitive Streak

We are better motivated when we have tangible targets for either goals or competitors.  Ever ride a bike or run on the road and use the guy jogging in front of you as a target?  Same thing here.

So assuming you know what your retirement will look like, you’ll be able to put a number to it.  Now find out how you’re doing with a personal benchmark.  One way is to go to www.INGcompareme.com, a public website run by the financial giant ING which allows you to compare your financial status with others of similar age, income and assets.  Or try the calculators found at the bottom of the home page for www.ClearViewWealthAdvisors.com. This might help give you the motivation you need to save more if needed.

Use Checklists

They can save your life.  And even the lives of your passengers.  Just ask Captain Sully who credits his crew with good training and following a process that minimized the distractions from a highly emotional scene above the Hudson River.

The daily grind can be distracting.  Often we may be unable to see the big forest because of the trees standing in our path to retirement.

So try these tips:

Mid-thirties to early 40s:

  • Target a savings goal of 1.5 times your annual salary
    • Enroll in a company savings plan
    • Take full advantage of any 401k match that’s offered
    • Automatically increase your contributions by 5% to 10% each year (example: You set aside 4% this year; then next year set aside at least 4.5%)
    • If you max out what you can put aside in the company plan, consider adding a Roth IRA
    • Get your emergency reserves in place in readily available, FDIC-insured bank accounts, CDs or money markets
    • Invest for growth: Consider an allocation to equities equal to 128 minus your current age
    • Let your money travel: More growth is occurring in other parts of the world so don’t be stingy with your foreign stock or bond allocations.  Americans are woefully under-represented in overseas investing so try to look at a target of at least 20% up to 40% depending on your risk profile

Mid-Career (mid-forties to mid fifties)

  • Target a savings goal of 3 times your annual salary
    • Rebalance your portfolio periodically (consider at the very least doing so when you change your clocks)
    • Make any “catch-up” contributions by stashing away the maximum allowed for those over age 50
    • Consolidate your accounts from old IRAs, 401ks and savings to cut down on your investment costs and improve the coordination of your plan and allocation target

Nearing and In Retirement (Age 56 and beyond)

  • Target savings of six times your annual salary
    • Prune your stock holdings (about 40% of 401k investors had more than 80% in stocks according to Fidelity Investments)
    • Shift investments for income:  foreign and domestic hi-yield dividend paying stocks, some hi-yield bonds, some convertible bonds
    • Map out your retirement income plan – to sustain retirement cash flow you need to have a retirement income plan in place
    • Regularly review and rework the retirement income plan that incorporates any pensions, Social Security benefits and no more than 4% – 4.5% withdrawals from the investment portfolio stash accumulated
    • Have a Plan B ready:  Know your other options to supplement income from part-time work or consulting or tapping home equity through a reverse mortgage or receiving pensions available to qualifying Veterans.

Don’t be afraid to get a second opinion or help in crafting your plans form a qualified retirement professional.  You can find a CFP(R) professional by checking out the consumer portion of the Financial Planning Association website or by calling 617-398-7494 to arrange for a complimentary review with your personal money coach, Steve Stanganelli, CFP(R).

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Investing Mistake #1: Treating Investments Like a Part-Time Job and Not a Business.

“When a man tells you that he got rich through hard work, ask him: Whose?” Don Marquis

While you may be investing for a child’s education, a vacation home or retirement, the common ingredient for success really is the process, approach and mindset you bring to making investing a success.  Take it seriously and you get serious results.  If you are fearful, your results will reflect it.  If you are a daredevil, your results may reflect that, too.

All your personal goals are important, aren’t they? You’ve worked hard for your money, didn’t you?  So why not find a better way to make your money work smart for you?

Why Mindset Can Really Harm You

Too often, investors simply think that what and how they save won’t really matter.  They don’t have enough money to make it worth it and they don’t have the time to really focus on the whole investing game. I know, life gets in the way when you’re doing other things and making other plans.

Thinking of this made me remember visiting an underground cave with my friends John and Lisa on a trip through the Blue Mountains. We entered the caves on a tour and saw all these fantastic, awe-inspiring formations created by the centuries of slow drips of water and mineral from the cave ceilings.  The stalactites and stalagmites formed bridges and statues of animals and even formations reminiscent of the craftsmanship used to build the cathedrals of Medieval Europe.  Small, incremental and consistent efforts produced such grand results.  If it can happen in nature, why not for something like a college savings account?

Too often, investors simply throw up their hands and take the easy road.  They do nothing, make no changes and for fear of making a mistake or because they don’t know who to trust, they avoid working with a professional.

They may hear the media report that a monkey throwing darts at a list of mutual funds or stocks may have beaten a professional money manager. Another favorite topic in the financial press is how most money managers do not bear their index.  But on the other hand, other stories will focus on the fantastic results of quick trigger investment schemes of the day-trader variety.

Let’s face it:  How well your investments perform from day to day will not likely make a big difference in your lifestyle now.  But how well you plan and invest may determine if, how and when you can retire, build a legacy to pass on and do all the things that are on your personal “bucket list.”

Two Categories of Investors

So investors will fall into two categories:  Those who focus exclusively on performance and those who focus on process.

Most investors, despite repeated warnings in small print at the end of the ads,  will focus on past performance as reported by the popular press and websites.  So despite the daily constraints on time because of family and work, these same folks will pick up an occasional financial newspaper or magazine or troll some financial websites and pick up a few ideas. They’ll see a Top 10 list of investments from last quarter or last year and then buy them because they performed well over some arbitrary time frame.

The Part-Time Investor in Action

Those who are more well-to-do or successful or affluent are either too busy making money to focus their time on investing or they believe that they have the skills to handle things on their own because they are successful in their careers.

I’m reminded of a woman I met on several occasions to discuss a way to bring some order to her investments.  She was a single mom raising a teen and worked in a fast-paced, deadline sensitive business.  Whenever we spoke, we were regularly interrupted by ringing phones and a buzzing pager.  Although she barely had time for lunch, much less research basic investment concepts, she ultimately decided that she would go it alone and master an online trading strategy to buy and sell stocks and options.

If you’re a successful surgeon or restaurateur or engineer or banker, do you really think that the same skill set that got you to the top of your profession, will also mean you can invest the time needed to properly manage and protect your wealth – not just your investments, but the whole set of tax, asset protection, retirement strategy planning, credit and cash management concepts?

Highly successful people may have achieved enviable incomes but can tend to be haphazard or casual about investing and integrating a financial plan.  Often, they may think that their incomes are secure, their career path certain, and they have skill and time to handle things on their own.

In reality, most may not really know what it takes to get to their goal.  For a 49-year old executive with a good $400,000 annual income and a $1 million investment portfolio trying to target for a retirement lifestyle at age 65 without much down scaling, he has to grow his nest egg to $6 million within a mere decade and a half.

And there is the equally disturbing statistic that the Great Recession has been hard on white collar professionals.  Those with college and advanced degrees make up more than 20% of the unemployed and long-term unemployed.

Be the CEO of Your Own Investment Company

Investing at any level and especially at this level requires a business mindset. The same sort of principles that apply to business success apply to your own investing. And just like any other CEO, you need to make sure that your assets are managed in a systematic, disciplined and prudent manner.

  • Business Plan: You need a business plan for your investments that covers the short and long term.  This means having a clear road map for your goals with appropriate benchmarks tied to achieving them. Instead of using the arbitrary indexes quoted by the media, you need to have a personal benchmark so you’re more likely to stay on target.
  • SMART GOALS: You need clear goals: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-Specific
  • Commit to a Realistic Strategy: You need a clear strategy for meeting those goals – a 20% annual return might sound nice but is it realistic given historical norms and your own experience and peace of mind
  • Don’t take it personally: As in business, don’t take the ups and downs in the market personally and don’t be afraid to review
  • Surround yourself with a professional team: If you’re serious about investing for success, then take the time to assemble a proper team of professionals who can help and who you can trust.  No business succeeds long term without a good team.

Don’t be too focused on your career to ignore this.  You can’t afford to treat your family’s future security as a part-time job or hobby.

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“Sometimes all it takes to change your life massively for the better is a small action and a small success, “ says David Bach, a noted author on money matters. 

  1. Consolidate Your Accounts:  Don’t wait for spring cleaning to roll around.  Make it easier on yourself by combining old 401(k) or IRA balances from your various old jobs.  This can help cut down on the amount of paper you receive and improve the chances you’ll have a coordinated investment plan. And it’s just one more way to have a more ‘green’ holiday.
  2. Pay Yourself First: While there always seems like there’s more month at the end of your paycheck, you can only get ahead by making a point of putting aside money in savings.  It doesn’t matter if it’s just $5 or 5% of each paycheck as long as it’s consistent.  Start somewhere and try to build up to your target of at least 5% of your net cash flow. Direct the money into a separate money market account that you can’t access easily from an ATM or debit card.
  3. Get to Know Where Your Money Goes:  For most people cash flow is not the problem. It’s cash retention that is a challenge. There always seems to be too much flow away from you.  Set up a system to keep track of where your money is spent.  Whether you decide to use a notebook or financial accounting software like Quicken or an online service like Mint.com, this is a first step to getting the information you need to decide what your spending priorities should be. 
  4. Cut Expenses:  Armed with the information from your tracking, now consider ways to lower expenses.  Do you really need a daily Mucho Grande from your favorite coffee place?  At $5 a day, your habit could help pay for your annual vacation or pay down your credit card or mortgage debt. Do you really use all those movie channels?  Can you wear a sweater and lower the thermostat?  Do you really need to be in the mall? Cut down on impulse shopping by creating and sticking to a master list of groceries and household goods.
  5. Reduce Temptation: Consider saving the bulk of any bonus checks or raises.  By automatically diverting this money, you’ll be able to add to your emergency stash, have cash to pay down debt or even invest. See #2 above.
  6. Reevaluate Your Risk Tolerance:  One of the most useful services that financial planners can offer is helping you really articulate your goals and establish your tolerance for investing risk.  After the bumpy ride of the past 18 months, most folks realize that they may not have had a handle on this.
  7. Avoid the Casino Mentality: It is an understatement that investing in the market can be risky but now is not the time to try to play catch up by “doubling down” or chasing the hottest investments ideas.  Remember the story of the tortoise and hare.  Sometimes the race doesn’t go to the swiftest but the most consistent.  So diversify your eggs into different baskets and watch those baskets.  For help in choosing the right mix of investments and a style that will help you sleep better at night, consider meeting with a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER ™ professional.
  8. Rebalance Your Investments:  Over time, accounts that have been consistently rebalanced tend to have higher balances.  So plan to rebalance at least annually or even quarterly.  But first you need to have targets in mind so that you can unemotionally prune back your winners while adding to the laggards.
  9. Add to Your Retirement:  If you haven’t taken advantage of your employer’s sponsored retirement plan, start now.  If your employer doesn’t offer a plan or you’re self-employed, start your own.  Resolve to set aside at least the amount that will get you the maximum company match.   Ideally, you should know your “NUMBER” for living in retirement the way you want.  Consulting with a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER ™ professional can help you here.
  10. Get Planning Advice to Map Your Route to Your Goals:  Maybe you’ve winged it and thought your home and 401(k) were your tickets to a secure retirement.  Odds are that your planning is not filling the bill.  Sit down with a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER ™ professional to discuss your whole picture and map out the action steps that will help keep you on track for financial success.

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