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Posts Tagged ‘Roth IRA’

For college-bound students, funding retirement has to be the farthest thing from their minds. Yet, with a little planning, parents may be able to kill two birds with one stone. Unfortunately, most parents of college-bound kids tend to overlook some obvious ways to lower the cost of college but wisely using the tax code and some retirement planning techniques can help.

It may be a low-priority item, but this strategy can help parents when it comes to planning how to pay for college. How?  By lowering the Expected Family Contribution (or EFC) of the family and sheltering assets in a retirement account, there is the potential for qualifying for more needs-based financial aid.

Roth IRA

Consider using a Roth IRA for any earnings that a student has from part-time work.  For students over 16 they can put away up to $5,000 each year (or up to their total earnings, whichever is less) from all those part-time or summer jobs. Students already in college can also use this same strategy.

A Roth IRA allows any wage earner regardless of age to put money away now and then later withdraw money without paying taxes on the earnings. When you contribute to a Roth IRA, there is no tax deduction as there is with a traditional Individual Retirement Account (IRA) but there are other advantages.

If a student earns money and the parents leave it commingled in one of their accounts, the balance will potentially be assessed at the student’s higher rate as an asset available for paying for school.  Parents may want to maintain control over funds and have the earnings put into an account in their name but this will show up as a parental asset subject to assessment by the financial aid formulas used by colleges.

On the other hand, funds in a Roth IRA are not counted and will not affect financial aid calculations.

Follow the Road Map

The key to this strategy is following the rules of the road. Any funds placed in the account as a contribution may be withdrawn at any time free of taxes or penalties.

For earnings that may accrue on the account balance, these may be subject to income taxes or penalties but there are exceptions.

Converted Assets

For amounts that were converted from another IRA and recharacterized as a Roth, there are special rules.  For amounts that meet the five-year holding test (from the date the account was first opened) then no income taxes or early withdrawal penalties apply. If a withdrawal is made within five years, then a 10% early withdrawal penalty applies unless it is for a special purpose.  One of the eight special purposes is withdrawals used for higher education expenses.

Withdrawals of Earnings

While income taxes will apply, no 10% early withdrawal penalties apply when the proceeds are used for one of eight special purposes including higher education expenses.

Distribution Rules

For distributions from a Roth IRA you need to note that Roth contributions are always considered to be the first amounts withdrawn.  These are not taxable.  Then any amounts that were converted from other IRAs are considered to be withdrawn second and subject to the time line noted above.  Finally, earnings on the account are considered to be withdrawn last.

Ideal for the Self-Employed Parent

Consider employing your kid in your business and paying them instead of just giving them an allowance.  I write about this on a previous blog found here. This way you can lower the taxable profit from your business which may help you qualify for more financial aid.  And by diverting the wages earned into a Roth IRA as a contribution, your child will not have this asset exposed for the financial aid calculations.

Use It Now or Later

This strategy can be used for late-starters, those who haven’t saved enough for upcoming college bills.

But it can also work very well if you start early.  Since there is a five-year rule in place, open a Roth IRA account even while the child is in middle school and working part-time outside the home or in the family business.  Then by the time the child is ready to enter his third or fourth year of college, he may be able to withdraw some of the earnings to pay for costs without paying any penalties.

By using this strategy, parents can help their students learn to save and the funds can be available in a tax-efficient way during college to pay qualified education expenses.  Or they can skip the withdrawals while in college and use them later for graduate school or to help pay for their first home purchase.

Advantages of This Strategy:

  • Shelters assets from financial aid calculations
  • May help lower family Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
  • Instills value of saving early for goals
  • May help accumulate capital that can be used later for school with tax efficient withdrawals
  • May help save for future home purchase or better yet … retirement

 

For more tips, check out my free webinar offered monthly. For a current schedule visit the Clear View website.

 

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The holiday season is almost upon us.  Before we all get caught up in the spirit of the season (or mayhem, depending on your perspective), consider taking time to get your fiscal house in order with these tips.

The Year of the RMD

Last year, required minimum distributions (RMDs) were not required as Congress granted a reprieve to not force clients to take distributions from severely depressed retirement accounts.

That free pass is not available this year.  So if you or someone you know is over age 70 1/2, you have to take a distribution from your IRAs.  This also applies to those who are beneficiaries of inherited IRA accounts as well.

Distributions don’t have to be taken from each IRA account but a calculation must be made based on the value of all accounts at the end of last year.  Then a withdrawal can be made from one or more accounts as long as it at least equals the minimum amount.

Think Ahead for Higher Taxes

In all likelihood, taxes will be higher next year.  As things stand, the Bush-era tax cuts are set to expire and marginal income tax rates and estate taxes will increase.

So look to booking capital gains this year if possible since tax rates on both long-term and short-term gains are certainly lower this year.

Reduce Concentration

There’s obviously enough going on to distract any investor but what I’m talking about here is concentrated stock positions.  Many clients may take advantage of company-sponsored stock purchase plans or have inherited positions concentrated in just a few stock positions.

Regardless of one’s age, this is risky.  This is especially risky to concentrate your income and your investments with your employer.  Remember Enron?  How about WorldCom?  Or maybe Alcatel-Lucent?

So given the lower capital gains tax rates that exist definitely now (versus a proposed but illusory extension later), it makes sense to reduce the highly concentrated positions in one or more stocks.

I know a widow who inherited the stock positions that her husband bought.  These included AT&T and Apple.  While AT&T was once a great “widow and orphans” stock paying out a reliable dividend because of the cash flow generated from its near monopoly status in telephone services, it broke up into so many Baby Bells.  The dividends from these have not matched the parent company and the risks of these holdings have increased as the telecom sector  has become more volatile.

And while Apple has been a soaring success for her (bought very low), it represents over one-third of her investment holdings.

Like most people I come across, she has emotional ties to these holdings.  And while she and others like her would not think of going into a casino to put all their chips on one or two numbers at the roulette wheel, they don’t find it inconsistent to have a lot of their eggs in just one or two investment baskets.

Since she relies on these investments to supplement her income, she needs to think about how to protect herself.  Although people may recognize this need, it doesn’t make it any easier to get people to do what is in their best interests when their emotions get in the way.

‘Tis the Season for Giving

Right now the highest marginal income tax bracket is 35% which is set to rise to 39.6%.  And capital gains tax rates are set to rise as well.  And come January 1, the capital deduction on gifts will be reduced from 35% to 28%.  All of this makes giving substantial gifts to charities a little more costly for your wallet.  So if you’re planning to make a large charitable donation, it pays to speed it up into this year.

To Roth or Not to Roth – Year of the Conversion?

This year provides high-earners an opportunity to convert all or part of their tax-deferred accounts to Roth IRAs which offers an opportunity to pay no income tax on withdrawals in the future.

The decision to take advantage of this opportunity needs to be weighed against the availability and source of cash to pay taxes now on previously deferred gains in the tax-deferred IRAs or 401ks. It also must consider the assumptions about future income tax rates and even whether or not future Roth IRA withdrawal rules might be changed by Congress.

Create an Investment Road Map

To really help gain clear direction on your investing, you really should consider sitting down with an adviser who will help you draft your personal investment road map (an Investment Policy Statement) that outlines how investment purchase and sale decisions will be made, what criteria will be used to evaluate proposed investments and how you will gauge and track results toward your personal benchmark.

This exercise helps establish a clear process that minimizes the impact of potentially destructive emotional reactions that can lead you astray.

Rebalance and Diversify

Just as you might plan on changing the batteries in your smoke detectors when you reset the clocks in the spring and fall, you should rebalance your investments periodically as well.

Now is as good a time as any to reassess your risk tolerance.  Research has shown that an investor’s risk tolerance is dynamic and influenced by general feelings about yourself, your situation and the world around you.  With the world’s stock markets showing many positive gains, this may lead some to become more willing to take risks.  This may not be a good thing in the long run so really question your assumptions about investing.

Armed with your investment road map and a risk profile, you will be in a better position to determine the mix of investments for diversification.  Don’t be afraid of adding to the mix investment asset classes that may not be familiar.  The idea of diversification is assembling investment assets that complement each other while potentially reducing risk.  And just as the economy has changed and the types of industries that are dominant rise and fall, it’s fair to say that what is “in” now may be “out” later making it important to reconsider your mix.

For this reason, this is why looking abroad to developed and emerging markets still makes sense.  Many of these economies are not bogged down by the after-effects of the great financial meltdown. And the rise of their consumerist middle classes means the potential to take advantage of demographics favoring growth sectors like natural resources, telecom, agriculture and technology.

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Lots of ink has been spilled discussing one of the most hyped retirement and tax strategies: Roth IRA conversions.  The prospect of future tax-free withdrawals is enticing.  But there are lots of issues that need to be considered whether it is right for you.

According to Google, there has been a surge in interest about Roth IRA conversions as it has become one of the top search terms this fall. (1)

This is hardly surprising considering that starting in 2010, all taxpayers, regardless of income, are eligible to convert tax-deferred retirement assets to a Roth IRA.

Prior to the change, the law prevented taxpayers with household incomes above $100,000 from converting assets to a Roth IRA.

Starting this year, tax code changes allow conversions of other tax-deferred retirement accounts regardless of income. This broadens the opportunity for those who did not have these choice before. It should be noted that there are still annual income limits in place for determining eligibility to contribute to a Roth IRA. (There are no limits to use a Roth 401k provision in your employer’s plan).

The majority of Americans believe their own taxes are going to increase.  Given government deficits and entitlements for an aging workforce, taxes may certainly be needed to cover these commitments.

As it stands, tax rates are scheduled to increase in 2011. Unless Congress acts to delay reversion to the prior tax rates, taxes on Roth IRA conversions will be higher after 2010.

A Roth IRA conversion offers an opportunity for future tax-free income.2

But does it make sense?

Does Roth Conversion Make Sense

Whether or not a Roth conversion makes sense really depends on an individual’s circumstances.

Money in all types of tax-deferred accounts like IRAs, 401ks and such are all jointly owned by the participant and Uncle Sam as silent partner.

Although the tax tail shouldn’t wag the dog, you should cut the best deal with the least impact on your personal tax situation.

It makes the most sense for those who expect to have more than enough assets and income for retirement and don’t want to be forced to take Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) on IRA accounts.  It also makes sense for estate planning purposes as a way to build a multi-generational legacy of tax-deferred wealth accumulation.

And for most who believe that their marginal income tax rates in retirement will be higher whether because of tax policy or because of their own success with work and investments, then it may make sense to lock in the tax liability now.

It also makes sense for those who expect a low income year in 2010 because of retirement or unemployment for example.  Being in a lower tax bracket may reduce the tax bite on the converted funds.

While income and earnings may be withdrawn in retirement tax-free, an investor will still need to pay Uncle Sam now for that future privilege.

And all of this analysis assumes that Congress doesn’t change the rules down the road and even tax Roth accounts.  Consider the fact that during the 1980s, Congress changed the rules about taxing Social Security benefits.

Keeping that in mind, it still may make sense as a way to hedge against future tax policy to do a partial conversion of some of your tax-deferred retirement accounts especially if you have money from non-IRA accounts to tap.

If you use the funds from the tax-deferred account and you’re younger than 59 ½, you’ll be hit with an early withdrawal penalty and your investment will be starting from a lower base making the payback of the strategy more complicated.

Because the tax is assessed on the gains in the account, an ideal time to do this and minimize the tax impact is when account values are off their highs.  With the gains over the past year, this may make a conversion less attractive.

Another thing to consider is that by doing a conversion, your adjusted gross income will increase and potentially result in loss of COBRA subsidy or education credits which are subject to income phase outs.

You Can Change Your Mind Later

Unlike most things in life, you can get a “do over” called a recharacterization that converts everything back to the way it was. The assets would be converted back to tax-deferred status and you can file an amended tax return seeking a refund of the income taxes you paid on the conversion.

Roth IRA conversions offer the potential for tax-free income in retirement for taxpayers at all income levels. If you want more information about converting to a Roth IRA, call 617-398-7494 or email today.

It’s critical to review your individual situation before making a decision about moving important assets.
1) InvestmentNews, November 16, 2009
2) Rasmussen Reports, September 3, 2009

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It’s never too early or even too late to start planning for ways to pay for college or post-graduate school.

Myths

There are a number of myths out there that can adversely impact your planning efforts:

1.) There’s not enough aid available;

2.) Only students with good grades get aid;

3.) My family makes too much money to qualify.

Reality

In reality, both “self-help” aid like loans and “gift” aid like grants and scholarships are available.  To increase your odds for getting your share there are a number of education-oriented and tax-oriented strategies you can use.

Some Tips When Applying for Financial Aid:

  • Fund Your Retirement— “Federal method” for calculating need usually does not consider retirement assets so put as much as you can into these accounts.
  • Reduce Assets Held in the Student’s Name—Parental assets are assessed at a lower rat: So buy the computer, dorm furniture or car in the base year (the year before filing the FAFSA) out of your student’s savings accounts.
  • Avoid Cash Gifts to Students—It’s Better for Grandma to Pay the School Directly: If you’re not qualifying for aid, at least it may help out her tax planning.  Better yet, take out the loans which are deferred until graduation and then let grandma help pay them.  This way you maximize your student aid without having grandma’s help count against the student.
  • Employ Your Child in Your Business and Use the Income to Fund a Roth IRA. The earnings won’t be subject to some of the typical payroll taxes because you’re employing family (restrictions apply) and by stashing it into the Roth, you’re building up a pot of money that can be withdrawn without tax penalty when used for qualified education expenses as long as the account has been open 5 years.

 

For more tips and help, consider using a qualified College Aid Planner like a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (TM) professional.

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Do you own investment real estate or a business? Have you been considering buying a rental property or starting a business? Have kids going to college in a few years?

If you already plan on your kids going to college, it’s never too late to start planning effective and efficient ways to increase savings, lower your taxes and improve your odds for receiving student financial aid.

Let’s say you already give your children an allowance. You’re already paying out of pocket and not getting any tax benefit. With a few changes you can turn that cash outflow into a tax deductible expense that can even help your kids save for college.

Consider hiring them to work in your business or on the rental property you own.

By paying them a reasonable wage for services like landscaping, cleaning, painting, shoveling snow or doing office administrative work like filing, stuffing envelopes or printing marketing flyers, you have an additional deductible expense which lowers the net income or increases the net loss of your business or property.

And for children earning income in the family business, there is no requirement for payroll taxes. And if you keep the amount of “earned” income below certain limits, you won’t be at risk of paying any “kiddie” tax either. (“Kiddie” tax limits adjust for inflation each year).

In effect, you have shifted income from a taxpayer with a higher tax rate to a low- or no-income tax paying child.

Now get your child to open a Roth IRA with the money you pay them and they have the added benefit of tax-free saving for college since Roth IRAs can be tapped for college tuition without paying a penalty as long as the Roth is open for at least five years (restrictions apply).

By reducing your income, you can also reduce your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) which is the critical number used to determine the amount and kind of student financial aid your child can get for college. The EFC is calculated using a number of things including the amount and type of parental assets as well as reported income. EFC is recalculated each time a financial aid form is submitted and is based on the assets and income from the year before.

So to improve your odds for financial aid, one strategy is to lower your reported income. By employing your child to lower your business or rental property income, you may be able to lower your EFC and improve the amount of aid your child receives.

About Steve Stanganelli, CFP ®

Steven Stanganelli, CRPC®, CFP® is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER ™ Professional and a CHARTERED RETIREMENT PLANNING COUNSELOR (sm) with Quest Financial, an independent fee-only financial planning and investment advisory firm with corporate offices in Lynnfield, Massachusetts and satellite locations in Woburn and Amesbury.

Steve is a five-star rated, board-certified financial planning professional offering specialized financial consulting advice on investments, college planning, divorce settlements and retirement income planning using alternatives like self-directed IRAs.

For more information on financial planning strategies, call Steve at 888-323-3456.

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Did you know that close to $4.2 Trillion in IRA and retirement account assets can be invested in much more than the standard run-of-the-mill investment choices offered at Big Box investment companies?

Ever since IRAs were first introduced in the 1970s, investors have been permitted to invest in a range of stock market alternatives including non-publicly traded assets such as real estate, notes and loans, private equity and tax liens.  But not many financial advisors and even fewer investors are fully aware of the options.

Legendary investor Warren Buffett uses a simple rule for success:  Invest in what you know and understand.  Diversification offers risk protection. And what better way to diversify than to own something that you have experience with like real estate or a business?

You may find greater portfolio diversification and a return-on-investment that might be better geared to meet your individual goals when you consider investing in what you know from experience.

Any IRA including a traditional IRA, SEP, Roth IRA, Coverdell Education Savings Accounts and solo 401(k) can use a portion of IRA funds to acquire interests in these various stock market alternatives.   Essentially, an investor determines the amount and source of the funds, transfers them to an independent third party custodian to hold and then instructs the custodian to release funds to acquire an investment in one or more alternatives.  The custodian also holds all income for the investor derived from the investment.

The “rules of the road” can be complex but not impossible to navigate with proper guidance.  Basically, an investor, spouse, lineal descendant or fiduciary advisor is a “prohibited person” and cannot “self-deal” or make personal use of the property.  With few exceptions, a “prohibited person” cannot work for or take income from an IRA investment.

What can an investor do?  Combine multiple IRAs from many individuals along with personal funds to buy property as co-tenants, for example.

It’s easier to list the things that a self-directed IRA cannot use as possible investments.  These include 1.) collectibles, 2.) life insurance contracts, and 3.) stock in a Sub-Chapter “S” corporation.  Most everything else is fair game.

If structured properly, the self-directed IRA can act as a lender to help facilitate a real estate transaction. Self-directed IRAs can invest as a member of an LLC or as a stockholder of a C-Corporation or even as a Limited Partner.  This is one way to add a level of asset protection to an investment.

Harnessing the power of a self-directed IRA may offer an investor a whole new way to invest and get retirement dreams back on track.

For a guide to Self-Directed IRA Basics including the “rules of the road” for avoiding IRS trouble spots, please call 617-398-7494 or email steve@ClearViewWealthAdvisors.com for a free copy of the notes from his presentation made to Greater Lowell Landlord Association members on November 11, 2009.

About Steve Stanganelli, CFP ®

Steve is a five-star rated, board-certified financial planning professional offering specialized consulting advice on investments including self-directed IRAs.  Steve is principal of Clear View Wealth Advisors, LLC, a fee-only Registered Investment Adviser located in Amesbury and Wilmington and can be reached at 617-398-7494.

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In the initial article of this series, I mentioned ten specific ways to lower college costs.  These included such ideas as taking Advanced Placement exams to earn college credit, considering an in-state college, using the American Opportunity Tax Credit  formerly known as the Hope Education Credit, employing your child in your business or investment real estate business and encouraging your child to use the proceeds to fund a Roth IRA.

But even if you haven’t stashed a lot aside for expected college costs, there are strategies you can take to maximize the financial aid that your child may be able to receive.

Many parents mistakenly believe that they “make too much money” to receive aid.  Or they look at the “sticker price” of a private school and think that it is way too expensive to afford.  In reality most people never pay the full sticker price and with some planning ahead of time many can find ways to make even such private schools within reach.

Yet many would be surprised to find out that by speaking with a knowledgeable professional they increase their chances for an aid package that makes college more affordable and less stressful to their personal retirement plans.

Remember that the more time you have before your child or children begin college, the more options you have.  But even if college tuition bills loom on the horizon, there are things that you can do to be better prepared.

Expected Family Contribution:

Everything depends on the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) calculated from a review of income and asset documentation and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) completed after January 1 of your student’s senior year of high school.

A particular formula is applied to this information to determine what income and assets are eligible from the family (including the student) toward the total cost of a year at college for everything from tuition and fees to room and board, books, supplies and travel.

  1. So this first year, called the “base year,” is the crucial one.

Ultimately then, your goal is to lower your EFC by employing strategies that lower your income or assets in the crucial base year.

Consider this:  If you own a business, you could increase your outflow for needed equipment that results in a lower net income.  You could delay your billings and collections to also lower your net income.  While a business owner needs to report the value of a business, the FAFSA form is not the place to brag.  The value of one’s business need only include actual cash on hand and tangible assets but not intangibles like “goodwill.”  This may help lower the value of your business and increase the amount your student may ultimately be eligible to receive.

On the other hand, maybe you’ve always considered starting a business or because of your job prospects this has become a necessity.  Don’t wait until the children have started or finished school.  By launching the business in the base year, you will incur expenses (including possibly depreciation on equipment) that will lower your reported income.

Even if you don’t own a business, you may have some control over the income and assets you report.

If your child will need a car, a computer or other school supplies, consider buying them in the year before completing the FAFSA.  Since credit card debt is not taken into account in the FAFSA, use extra cash instead to pay off these debts.  Another option might be to prepay property taxes or your mortgage which also provides you with an added tax deduction. All of these strategies will lower the cash on hand.

If you’re expecting a year-end bonus, then try to negotiate with your employer to defer receipt of the bonus into a non-base year.  By doing so, you’ll avoid having the colleges count this twice: once as income in the base year and then again possibly as an asset in your savings accounts.

It’s important to minimize assets held by the student.  So consider using savings or investment accounts held in the student’s name to acquire a car or computers or other needed supplies.  It’s also a good idea to dissuade grandparents and family members from giving cash gifts to the child.  In lieu of a gift to the student, a grandparent could direct the same amount of cash to pay toward the college tuition or fees.

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