Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘self-directed IRA’

Girish asks, “I have heard people talk about ‘taking advantage of’ or ‘minting money from’ a recession. How does one do it?”

If you have cash you can find great bargains in almost any market or asset class – whether it is a stock, bond, mutual fund, buying tax liens or judgments or even real estate.  This is the classic sort of value investing espoused by Benjamin Graham and practiced masterfully by Warren Buffet.

Certainly, when stock prices are down you can pick up shares in companies with strong brands, franchises, marketing and cash flow but which may be temporarily out of favor because of investor fear.  This is certainly what happened during the Great Financial Meltdown.  Those who had the stomach for it and the cash to back it up could buy up many companies at bargain prices.

The key is having the cash and not being over-leveraged. There are lots of stories (most recently in BusinessWeek) about developers who are mortgaged to the hilt and unable to maneuver now as they are caught in a foreclosure squeeze.   Liquidity is really the key to crises.

If you have the cash and the stomach for the risks, you can buy into distressed areas of the market: tax liens, providing capital as a loan with equity kicker to an operating business that may be short of cash because banks are too timid to lend, real estate to fix up and rent (and later on use as a vacation property if you properly structure a 1031 exchange for example.

Some of these tactics can be done with non-qualified money. But one can even consider doing it through a self-directed IRA. Not every custodian is set up to allow this but there are some specialized non-bank custodians that will help set up such accounts. (One such custodian is PENSCO Trust). And the income that may be generated can be tax deferred allowing for more capital to be available for investment or to compound longer.

This is not a substitute for a broadly diversified investment portfolio but a supplement; you could call it the “opportunity” or “tactical” bucket.

The key is cash and an understanding of your personal risk profile. And most require a time horizon longer than a typical day trader’s.

Sure, the key to investing success is to buy almost anything low and sell it higher later.  But don’t limit yourself to just stocks.  There are opportunities beyond just stocks where astute and risk-tolerant investors can take advantage of what arbitrageurs call “information asymmetries.” And they may even be in your local market.

This is where a good financial adviser can help.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Is real estate still a good investment?

As a landlord dealing with sometimes rowdy tenants or unexpected repairs, you may wonder whether or not it’s still worth it.

Despite these headaches and the ongoing doom and gloom reported about real estate prices, owning investment real estate continues to provide a number of benefits.

Buying a property offers a number of favorable tax benefits, a way to generate income, diversify a personal investment allocation and in some cases have a tenant pay for your personal housing expenses.

As an investment property owner, you can deduct a host of expenses connected with operating the property including mortgage interest, property taxes, utilities and repairs. Aside from actual expenses incurred, property owners also benefit from a valuable non-cash expense: depreciation.

Losses generated from rental activities are typically considered to be “passive activity losses” with an exception for real estate professional. These losses can then be used to offset other passive income from another real estate investment or another type of passive investment such as in a private limited partnership. Disallowed passive activity losses and credits are deferred until there is passive income generated or the property is disposed in a taxable transaction.

Like all good rules there are exceptions. Although “passive activity” losses by rule must be used to offset other passive activity income, there are additional tax benefits available to those who are low- or middle income earning households.

For those who have adjusted gross income below $100,000 and “actively participate” in the management of the rental property, a real estate investor may use up to $25,000 in passive activity losses to offset non-passive income like income from wages or a business.

This remains one of the few tax shelters available to moderate income taxpayers. And like any other gift from the IRS, it comes with certain strings attached. In this case, the ability to use this passive activity loss exception phases out above certain income thresholds starting at $100,000 of AGI reduced $1 for every $2 of income above the threshold until eliminated at $150,000 AGI.

The key to “active participation” generally means involvement in management decisions about the property. Choosing the kind of paint or wallpaper? Reviewing bids for different contractors? Collecting the rent? All may be considered part of the active participation of the property owner.

About Steve Stanganelli, CFP ®

Steve is a five-star rated, board-certified financial planning professional offering specialized consulting advice on investments including self-directed IRAs and retirement income planning. Steve is affiliated with Quest Financial Services, a fee-only Registered Investment Advisor located in Lynnfield and can be reached at 888-323-3456.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steven_Stanganelli

Read Full Post »

Do you own investment real estate or a business? Have you been considering buying a rental property or starting a business? Have kids going to college in a few years?

If you already plan on your kids going to college, it’s never too late to start planning effective and efficient ways to increase savings, lower your taxes and improve your odds for receiving student financial aid.

Let’s say you already give your children an allowance. You’re already paying out of pocket and not getting any tax benefit. With a few changes you can turn that cash outflow into a tax deductible expense that can even help your kids save for college.

Consider hiring them to work in your business or on the rental property you own.

By paying them a reasonable wage for services like landscaping, cleaning, painting, shoveling snow or doing office administrative work like filing, stuffing envelopes or printing marketing flyers, you have an additional deductible expense which lowers the net income or increases the net loss of your business or property.

And for children earning income in the family business, there is no requirement for payroll taxes. And if you keep the amount of “earned” income below certain limits, you won’t be at risk of paying any “kiddie” tax either. (“Kiddie” tax limits adjust for inflation each year).

In effect, you have shifted income from a taxpayer with a higher tax rate to a low- or no-income tax paying child.

Now get your child to open a Roth IRA with the money you pay them and they have the added benefit of tax-free saving for college since Roth IRAs can be tapped for college tuition without paying a penalty as long as the Roth is open for at least five years (restrictions apply).

By reducing your income, you can also reduce your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) which is the critical number used to determine the amount and kind of student financial aid your child can get for college. The EFC is calculated using a number of things including the amount and type of parental assets as well as reported income. EFC is recalculated each time a financial aid form is submitted and is based on the assets and income from the year before.

So to improve your odds for financial aid, one strategy is to lower your reported income. By employing your child to lower your business or rental property income, you may be able to lower your EFC and improve the amount of aid your child receives.

About Steve Stanganelli, CFP ®

Steven Stanganelli, CRPC®, CFP® is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER ™ Professional and a CHARTERED RETIREMENT PLANNING COUNSELOR (sm) with Quest Financial, an independent fee-only financial planning and investment advisory firm with corporate offices in Lynnfield, Massachusetts and satellite locations in Woburn and Amesbury.

Steve is a five-star rated, board-certified financial planning professional offering specialized financial consulting advice on investments, college planning, divorce settlements and retirement income planning using alternatives like self-directed IRAs.

For more information on financial planning strategies, call Steve at 888-323-3456.

Read Full Post »

Did you know that close to $4.2 Trillion in IRA and retirement account assets can be invested in much more than the standard run-of-the-mill investment choices offered at Big Box investment companies?

Ever since IRAs were first introduced in the 1970s, investors have been permitted to invest in a range of stock market alternatives including non-publicly traded assets such as real estate, notes and loans, private equity and tax liens.  But not many financial advisors and even fewer investors are fully aware of the options.

Legendary investor Warren Buffett uses a simple rule for success:  Invest in what you know and understand.  Diversification offers risk protection. And what better way to diversify than to own something that you have experience with like real estate or a business?

You may find greater portfolio diversification and a return-on-investment that might be better geared to meet your individual goals when you consider investing in what you know from experience.

Any IRA including a traditional IRA, SEP, Roth IRA, Coverdell Education Savings Accounts and solo 401(k) can use a portion of IRA funds to acquire interests in these various stock market alternatives.   Essentially, an investor determines the amount and source of the funds, transfers them to an independent third party custodian to hold and then instructs the custodian to release funds to acquire an investment in one or more alternatives.  The custodian also holds all income for the investor derived from the investment.

The “rules of the road” can be complex but not impossible to navigate with proper guidance.  Basically, an investor, spouse, lineal descendant or fiduciary advisor is a “prohibited person” and cannot “self-deal” or make personal use of the property.  With few exceptions, a “prohibited person” cannot work for or take income from an IRA investment.

What can an investor do?  Combine multiple IRAs from many individuals along with personal funds to buy property as co-tenants, for example.

It’s easier to list the things that a self-directed IRA cannot use as possible investments.  These include 1.) collectibles, 2.) life insurance contracts, and 3.) stock in a Sub-Chapter “S” corporation.  Most everything else is fair game.

If structured properly, the self-directed IRA can act as a lender to help facilitate a real estate transaction. Self-directed IRAs can invest as a member of an LLC or as a stockholder of a C-Corporation or even as a Limited Partner.  This is one way to add a level of asset protection to an investment.

Harnessing the power of a self-directed IRA may offer an investor a whole new way to invest and get retirement dreams back on track.

For a guide to Self-Directed IRA Basics including the “rules of the road” for avoiding IRS trouble spots, please call 617-398-7494 or email steve@ClearViewWealthAdvisors.com for a free copy of the notes from his presentation made to Greater Lowell Landlord Association members on November 11, 2009.

About Steve Stanganelli, CFP ®

Steve is a five-star rated, board-certified financial planning professional offering specialized consulting advice on investments including self-directed IRAs.  Steve is principal of Clear View Wealth Advisors, LLC, a fee-only Registered Investment Adviser located in Amesbury and Wilmington and can be reached at 617-398-7494.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: