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Archive for the ‘Ask the Adviser’ Category

Consumers and homeowners in particular tend to think that financial planning is all about investing.  In reality, the key to proper financial planning is making smart moves with your money to protect your hard-earned wealth.  Too often consumers fret about the specific investment’s return and ignore the things that they can control such as how to not lose money.

One of the key parts of a good financial plan is proper estate planning.  And one element of an estate plan is controlling for risks that can wipe out your wealth such as from a lawsuit or a creditor.

To that end the revisions that became effective with the updated Massachusetts Homestead Law will help all homeowners.

New Law in Massachusetts Will Protect Homeowners and Vital for Seniors

As reported in the Boston Tax Institute newsletter of May 31, 2011, the Massachusetts Legislature has enacted a new law that will increase homestead protection for homeowners in Massachusetts. Homestead protects a person’s residence from most creditors. If a homeowner is sued by a creditor or files for bankruptcy, a portion of their equity in their home – the “homestead estate” – is deemed unavailable to their creditors. The new law was passed on December 16, 2010, and became effective on March 16, 2011.

What a homestead exemption does is protect the property against attachment, levy on execution or a court-ordered forced sale to satisfy payment of a debt.

The new law essentially puts in place a minimum amount of coverage for all homeowners (now $125,000) and each homeowner can file the form to gain protection up to the extended amount ($500,000 or $1 million for an elder couple).

Cheap Protection Against Lawsuits or Creditors

This is cheap protection.  And vital for anyone.

Consider this: One lawsuit can not only ruin your day but force you to lose the equity in your home.

If you have teens at home and there is a severe car accident, you can be sued.  If you lose the lawsuit and are assessed a civil judgement by the court, the other party could put a lien on your home or even force the sale of the property to pay the claim.

An elder driver could drive through a wall or onto a sidewalk and cause property damage or personal injury that exceeds their insurance liability coverage.

These are only a couple of examples that could put someone’s home at risk.  This new law at least provides some basic protection and the extended coverage will provide more peace of mind.

Key Updates to the Law

Under the amended Massachusetts Homestead law (Estate of Homestead):

  • Massachusetts homeowners will receive automatic $125,000 protection against debt collectors (if they hold that much equity in their home) without having to do anything.
  • Homeowners can elect to file a homestead declaration with the Registry of Deeds, which will give homeowners up to $500,000 in equity protection from non-exempt creditors.  Homestead forms, or homestead deeds, are filed at the Registry of Deeds in the county in which the residence is located. The filing fee ranges from $35-$100.
  • For married couples, both spouses will now have to sign the form. Before only one spouse signed and protection was only afforded to the spouse who signed.  If a single person declares a homestead and subsequently gets married, the Homestead automatically protects the new spouse.
  • Homesteads now pass on to the surviving spouse and children who live in the home.  The protections also remain for transfers between relatives.
  • There is new protection for homeowners who receive insurance proceeds from fire or other damages.
  • There has always been confusion whether a homeowner had to re-file a homestead after a refinance.  The new law clarifies this issue – homeowners do NOT have to re-file a homestead after a refinance.  Under the new law, Homesteads are automatically subordinate to mortgages, and lenders are specifically prohibited from having borrowers waive or release a homestead.
  • Homesteads are now available for single families, condominiums, coops, manufactured homes and now for 2-4 unit homes; and also for homes that are held in a trust for estate planning or other reasons.
  • Closing attorneys in mortgage transactions must now provide borrowers with a notice of availability of a homestead.
  • There is no need to re-do/re-file an existing homestead under the new law.

The form itself is pretty easy to fill in and file with the registry where your primary residence is located and recorded.  For a $35 registry fee you could get $300,000 in protection from creditors (now up to $500,000).

Special note:  Attorney Ed Adamsky provided a clarification (thanks, Ed):

If you have already filed a homestead, you do not have to update it to get the benefits of the updated Massachusetts law. If you have not filed one, you should do so. In New Hampshire there is nothing to file

For specific guidance on legal issues, speak with a qualified attorney. For help in putting in place a financial plan or road map for your money that looks at all the pieces of your plan, then call a qualified financial planner who can help make sense of all the moving parts regarding your money.

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College costs continue to escalate.  The burden on families grows every year.

Even before the Great Recession trying to balance the competing and emotional needs of paying for college while trying to save for retirement was a struggle. Let’s face it: Paying for college is as much a retirement planning issue as anything else.  Don’t ever forget that.

So how much is a college education worth to you? The average price keeps going up and is the only part of the economy not showing any slowdown in price increases (besides gas prices of course).

  • Average public 4-year school tuition is now $16,000 per year
  • Private colleges are at $32,000 per year
  • Elite private colleges are near $50,000 per year

And this doesn’t include tuition, room, board, fees and “extras.”

Again, how much is this worth to you? Will you be satisfied eating Mac and Cheese or working as a Wal-Mart greeter during your “Golden Years” knowing that your child got the most expensive education that money could buy?

If the answer to that is “hell no,” then you’re at the right place.

Become an Informed Buyer of Education

Welcome to my latest blog where I will endeavor to bring you insightful and creative tips on how to be an informed consumer of higher education.

Trying to get a handle on what to do is difficult.  Let’s face it:  Unless you’re Octa-mom or do this everyday, you’re flying blind when it comes to figuring out how to manage paying for college. Have you actually seen a FAFSA form lately? Do you really want to?

Sure, if you have a couple of kids within a couple of years of each other, the rules might be the same.  Sure, you can rely on what your neighbors did for their kids who graduated a few years ago.

Or you can have a plan tailored to your situation.

Look, just like tax laws, financial aid rules and how college admissions officers work their magic change every year.

So you may as well have a plan and be a part of making it happen.

This blog and my website are here to help.

Stop by and let me know your thoughts.  Shoot me a question.  And feel free to try out the exclusive college planning service website on your own. And then let me know when you’re ready to get serious about this by calling me directly at 978-388-0020.

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This is a common question from many folks.

There are many valid reasons to consider a 401k rollover.

While changing jobs can be stressful and life can otherwise get in the way, you really should not neglect this.  Oftentimes, out of sight is out of mind and you could be losing money and not even know it.

Costs

While it may not seem like it, you are paying for your funds to stay with your old employer’s sponsored plan.  You just don’t see it.  Fees for employer plans are not very transparent.  While you may not see an actual bill, your employer is probably paying for the administration of the plan through hidden fees assessed on the balances held in it.

I have seen sponsored plans that had these back-end hidden fees and charged the participant a piece for each contribution.  A little here, a little there all adds up.  And the more it is, the less there is to compound for your retirement.

While there are few things that you can control in life and investing, fees are one of them.

In a rollover IRA, you’ll have more choices of platforms which may offer low loads and costs so you can keep more in your pocket.  So control what you can when you can for successful investing.

Choice and Access

While some employer plans may offer a variety of funds which may be top of the line, you’re still limited to the menu selected by your employer.  More often than not this is influenced by the broker associated with the plan.  And this can be influenced by the restrictions placed on the choices by the broker’s company or administrator because there may be an incentive to fill the menu with one fund family.

I’ve seen plans offered through national payroll companies that required more than 50% of the fund choices to be from one particular fund family.  Not every choice in a management company’s fund line up may be stellar so you’re limiting yourself by staying with the old plan.

When you rollover you’ll have a much larger universe to choose from.  (Like most independent fee-based advisers, my registered investment adviser company has access to more than 14,000 non-proprietary mutual funds with no loads or loads waived).  You’ll typically even have access to individual stocks, bonds, Unit Investment Trusts, Exchange Traded Funds and bank CDs.

The Self-Directed IRA Option – Not Available in Your 401(k)

Have you ever considered investing in something besides stocks, bonds or mutual funds? Maybe you might want to invest in real estate or buy judgments or invest in a business by being its lender or providing a friend with start-up capital.

Well, you can’t do that with a typical 401k plan.  But you can with a self-directed IRA.  And such an IRA can’t be done through the Big Box financial firms.  There are specialized bank and non-bank custodians who handle such transactions and work through independent financial planners to help their clients learn more about such options.

Risk Controls & Broader Choice of Investment Strategies

While you may have online access to your company-sponsored plan so you can make trades or switches of your funds periodically, there really are no risk controls that you can use given the limitations of the platform the 401k is using.

Let’s put it this way:  Investors make money when they don’t lose it.  At least that’s my working philosophy.  Having options and systems in place means that you stand a better chance of protecting your retirement nest egg.

It’s always easier to not lose money in the first place than it is to try to make up for lost ground.  Your money has to work harder to get back to breakeven — much less get ahead for your retirement goals.

Consider this:  If you think that Treasurys or munis are in their own bond bubbles, what can you do to protect yourself through your 401k?  Probably, not much.

But in your own IRA you’ll be able to build a more all-weather portfolio that includes inflation hedges like convertible bonds, foreign dividend-paying stocks, master limited partnerships or even managed futures.   All come in mutual funds or ETFs which offer the advantages of diversification without the tax and cost structures of direct investment options.

Want to lower costs and control your investments more? You can even buy individual corporate or taxable municipal bonds and build an income ladder with the help of a professional financial planner.

Or maybe you want to minimize the impact of another downdraft in the market.  Using ETFs and trailing stop-loss orders you may help protect your gains.  Not an option in your old 401k.

So when you roll your account over, you’ll also have access to professional help, tools and direct management options tailored to your specific needs that you just can’t get within your old 401k.

Actionable Suggestions – Things to Consider:

iMonitor Portfolio Program: We prepare the allocations, select the funds or other investments and monitor.  We will make changes and rebalancing decisions as needed for you.

Money Tools DIY Program: We prepare the allocations and select the funds.  We will offer recommendations on Exchange Traded Funds as well. Periodically, we send you updates for rotating funds or rebalancing. You manage the funds directly on whatever custodian or trading platform you choose.

For more information, please call Steve Stanganelli, CFP® at 978-388-0020 or 617-398-7494.

Check out the website and newsletter archives for more on this and similar topics:  www.ClearViewWealthAdvisors.com

Adapted from ViewPoint Newsletter Archive (January 20, 2011)

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No doubt about it.  This has been a very rough winter that we lived through here in the Boston area.

While the calendar has turned to spring, many of us are still trying to fix the damage left behind by snow and ice from so many winter storms.

As I write this it still seems like we have imported the weather that Seattle or Portland, Oregon might be know for (even if it is true that Seattle has more sunny days than Boston). It is cold, overcast and wet.  Not the best days for cycling (my other passion besides Spencer and Kristin hanging out on the side panel here).  Nor is it good weather to hang out on the back deck which is something that I like to do during my lunch breaks.

But even if the weather were cooperating, I would not be able to use my deck. Why?  Well, let’s just say that Mother Nature left me a souvenir and a reminder about her power.

With all the snow and ice that we got, it was hard to keep up and one too many snowstorms (coupled with a builder who decided to save money on lag bolts) finally collapsed the deck sometime in February.

I came home to a note from my neighbor – Don’t go out on your deck.  Not that I was planning to go out in the middle of a dark night. But that is where the gas grill was located and I guess if I was a grilling fool I might go out and it would have been a long way down after that first step.

Mother Nature is still flexing her muscles especially along the Mississippi River.  Now my deck is a small thing compared to the devastation left behind in the wake of multiple mega-tornadoes that crossed through the South sort of like General Sherman’s March to the Sea and swollen rivers now drowning hundreds of acres of farmland and threatening homes along the Mississippi.

But it is instructive.

A Teachable Moment

Let’s just say that you shouldn’t leave anything to chance.  Sure, you may have a homeowner’s policy and you renew it each year.  But don’t assume that the coverage that you had last year is going to help you this year.  And you really need to review your policies with a qualified agent (or a good financial adviser) regularly.

Do you really have the right coverage?  After you file a claim is not when you want to find out that you’re not covered.

I’m reminded of my neighbor – the same one who left me the note – who had his basement flooded after an ice storm and the power and his generator both went out.  He ended up with an indoor pool in his basement when the sump pump stopped working.  He didn’t know that he could have had a rider on his policy to cover sump pumps.  That was probably a $5,000 mistake for a $50 to $100 rider on his policy.

The Insurance Claims Process

So after my little incident, I called my agent to file a claim.  The insurance company had been very prompt in sending out paperwork and an adjuster.

Because it was tax season, I was unable to get way from the office to meet with the adjuster.  I described the damage to him including the generator located under the deck and the gas grill that was on it. He took his notes but pretty much did his thing when he inspected the property.

In the end, the insurance company adjuster filed his estimate with the insurer and I received a copy.  The insurer quickly cut a check for the amount shown on the estimate.

But I reviewed the estimate and noticed discrepancies.  The dimensions of the deck on his estimate were smaller than the actual size.  There was no note about the higher cost composite decking material that I had.  Instead the estimate covered replacement with regular wood. There was no notation about the damages to the generator and electrical work needed to reinstall it.  Nor was there any allowance for the damages to the items on the deck.

Now I understand that trying to inspect damage when snowbanks are four feet high around the deck and the deck itself is covered makes it really difficult to get a proper view of the damage. Nothing nefarious is going on here. And to their credit, the insurer did note that they would send out the adjuster again.

But there is no incentive on the part of the insurer or their adjuster to come back out.  As far as they are concerned the property damage claim is settled.

This is why it is all the more important for you as a homeowner and policyholder to protect yourself.

How?  Get professional help on your side.

Enter the Public Insurance Adjuster

OK.  You like your insurance company. I’ve seen the ads.  They offer great service and rates. The ads are cute sometimes. And in most cases, the insurance company estimate is more than fair.

But you owe it to yourself to get a second opinion. (Heck, that’s good advice on most things in life especially those concerning money).

This is where you call in the help of a Public Insurance Adjuster.

In my case, I called on the help of  Matthew Alphen of Lynnfield, Massachusetts.  I first met Matt years ago at a Kiwanis event and stay connected to him through BNI connections we shared.

Like other Public Insurance Adjusters, Matt is licensed by the state’s Division of Insurance. He represents consumers with claims.

He came out and did his inspection and his cost estimate is higher.

Granted the deck wasn’t covered in snow by that time so he didn’t have to trudge through the snowbanks that once surrounded it.

Granted he and other public adjusters have an incentive to provide an estimate that may be higher than the first because of the way that he gets compensated. Like most public adjusters he receives ten percent (10%) of the amount a homeowner collects from the insurance proceeds.

But that also means he has an incentive to do a thorough job when representing a homeowner.

Reasons for the higher estimate:

  • He used correct dimensions
  • He noted the materials used
  • He researched the city building code and noted changes that would require upgrades needed once the deck is rebuilt

What You Can Do to Protect Yourself

Like I said: This is a teachable moment.

So here is a short list of actionable items to consider when dealing with insurance for your home. It can also be applicable for other types of insurance claims as well such as autos, rental property and business.

  • Review your policies regularly with your agent.  (While I do not sell insurance, I do help clients review their policy terms and coverages as part of my financial planning services). This is especially important to make sure that the agent has a correct description of the property and any changes or additions made are properly covered.
  • Make sure your coverage includes a rider for inflation protection.  Without it you may out-of-pocket to cover more of the repair costs yourself.
  • Make sure your coverage also provides for updated building code protection so that any repairs that need to be done to meet the new rules are covered.  Otherwise, it’s going to be out of your pocket.
  • When you have a damage claim call a public insurance adjuster for a second opinion.
  • Get a financial plan in place.  A good fee-based or fee-only financial planner can provide a second set of eyes to help you review and find the right kinds of insurance coverage.

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I know that it’s been a while.  And for those who have been dropping by, I appreciate your continued support. Hopefully, others will find their way back and find the fresh perspective enlightening.  In a world of confusion, my mission continues to be to bring to light fresh ideas on how to plan better and wiser for college funding, divorce, retirement and investing.

As I noted in my last post, I became a registered tax preparer and member of the National Association of Tax Professionals.  Through my company Clear View Wealth Advisors, I had acquired the assets and client base of XtraRefunds, an income tax preparation service located in South Lawrence, Massachusetts.

I Survived

My last post was titled “adventures of a tax preparer” and I had hoped to provide some ongoing commentary on how things were going.

Unfortunately, getting the business relocated to new offices, organizing the IT and systems, learning the software and providing tax prep services to walk-in clients took up most of my time leaving me with very little brain power to provide any commentary here.

This has truly been a learning experience.  And I truly believe that it provides me with added tools and perspective to be a better financial adviser to individuals and business owners.

Bringing Financial Planning Services to the Masses

One thing that I had learned as a banker (I was a mortgage banker for more than 18 years you may recall) is the truism of the expression that a bank will gladly lend you money when you don’t really need it.

The same holds true for financial planning.  As a former representative of a wirehouse broker-dealer, I found that everyone wanted to give advice to the very rich and those who are well-off. But more often than not those who had less than some minimum amount of money were shunned and pretty much told “come back when you have more.”

That’s why I formed my financial planning practice as an independent registered investment adviser firm.  People need help at all stages and should not be left out in the cold just because their bank balances don’t have enough zeroes.

This is what I noted on my website and what I truly believe.

So I saw the integration of a tax preparation service as a way to help individuals by being there to offer financial planning tips and services.

Still Working Through the Growing Pains

Time will tell if my ideas in action make sense.

But from the stories that I heard I know that people of all income and education levels can benefit from having access to an objective financial professional who is not going to simply try selling them something.

Cost of Avoiding a Bad Mistake: Priceless

So I created financial plan program options for folks to use like the Advisor-On-Call program: pay one fee for the entire year and get access to me to answer any question on any issue during the year.

I know the need is there. Someone came in to see me and told me about her sister who lost everything when her apartment in Worcester burned down.  She didn’t have any renter’s insurance.  This was  a learning experience and I was able to teach the client why she needed the same type of coverage for herself.

Back in the Saddle

Now that tax season is over and the calendar has turned to spring (despite the weather I see outside my window), I am back on the bike saddle as well.   It’s usually on these long rides I do solo or with my cycling club that I get to clear my head and come up with new topics to write about here in the blog or in my newsletter.

Some of the wisdom that I expect to share with you over the coming weeks:

  • How to build a better retirement income plan using the bucket strategy
  • How to save on the cost of college even if your kid is a senior in high school
  • How to lower the cost of divorce in the long-run by selling the family home
  • How to get better yield outside of a bank money market

Thanks for stopping by and please keep on checking in.

And as always, your comments are greatly appreciated as are any questions or issues or story ideas that you want me to address.

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There are many valid reasons to consider a 401k rollover.

Costs

While it may not seem like it, you are paying for your funds to stay with your old employer’s sponsored plan.  You just don’t see it.  Fees for employer plans are not very transparent.  While you may not see an actual bill, your employer is probably paying for the administration of the plan through hidden fees assessed on the balances held in it.

I have seen sponsored plans that had these back-end hidden fees and charged the participant a piece for each contribution.  A little here, a little there all adds up.  And the more it is, the less there is to compound for your retirement.

While there are few things that you can control in life and investing, fees are one of them.

In a rollover IRA, you’ll have more choices of platforms which may offer low loads and costs so you can keep more in your pocket.  So control what you can when you can for successful investing.

Choice and Access

While some employer plans may offer a variety of funds which may be top of the line, you’re still limited to the menu selected by your employer.  More often than not this is influenced by the broker associated with the plan.  And this can be influenced by the restrictions placed on the choices by the broker’s company or administrator because there may be an incentive to fill the menu with one fund family.

I’ve seen plans offered through national payroll companies that required more than 50% of the fund choices to be of one particular fund family.  Not every choice in a management company’s fund line up may be stellar so you’re limiting yourself by staying with the old plan.

When you rollover you’ll have a much larger universe to choose from.  (My company has access to more than 14,000 non-proprietary mutual funds with no loads or loads waived).  You’ll typically even have access to individual stocks, bonds, Unit Investment Trusts, Exchange Traded Funds and bank CDs.

Have you ever considered investing in something besides stocks, bonds or mutual funds? Maybe you might want to invest in real estate or buy judgments or invest in a business by being its lender or providing a friend with start-up capital.

Well, you can’t do that with a typical 401k plan.  But you can with a self-directed IRA.  And such an IRA can’t be done through the Big Box financial firms.  There are specialized bank and non-bank custodians who handle such transactions and work through independent financial planners to help their clients learn more about such options.

Risk Controls & Broader Choice of Investment Strategies

While you may have online access to your company-sponsored plan so you can make trades or switches of your funds periodically, there really are no risk controls that you can use given the limitations of the platform the 401k is using.

Let’s put it this way:  Investors make money when they don’t lose it.  At least that’s my working philosophy.  Having options and systems in place means that you stand a better chance of protecting your retirement nest egg.

It’s always easier to not lose money in the first place than it is to try to make up for lost ground.  Your money has to work harder to get back to breakeven much less get ahead for your retirement goals.

Consider this:  If you think that Treasurys or munis are in their own bond bubbles, what can you do to protect yourself through your 401k?  Probably, not much.  But in your own IRA you’ll be able to build a more all-weather portfolio that includes inflation hedges like convertible bonds, foreign dividend-paying stocks, master limited partnerships or even managed futures.  All come in mutual funds or ETFs which offer the advantages of diversification without the tax and cost structures of direct investment options.

Or maybe you want to minimize the impact of another downdraft in the market.  Using ETFs and trailing stop-loss orders you may help protect your gains.  Not an option in your old 401k.

So when you roll your account over, you’ll also have access to professional help, tools and direct management options tailored to your specific needs that you just can’t get within your old 401k.

Things to Consider:

iMonitor Portfolio Program

Money Tools DIY Program

For more information, please call Steve Stanganelli, CFP® at the Rollover Helpline at 978-388-0020 or 617-398-7494.

Check out the website and newsletter archive for more on this and similar topics:  www.ClearViewWealthAdvisors.com.

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Reverse Mortgage Basics

A reverse mortgage is a type of loan that certain eligible homeowners can get to tap into the equity in their home. Unlike traditional loans, they do not require the same sort of underwriting so no income, asset or credit checks are needed.  And unlike a traditional loan, there is no monthly repayment for any amounts borrowed.  Repayment of the loan’s principal and interest starts only after the homeowner dies or the home is sold.

To be eligible for such a loan, all owners on the property title need to be at least age 62.

For the most part, reverse mortgages, also referred to as RMs, are backed by the federal government through the FHA (Federal Housing Administration) that administers the program.

Myth: The Bank Keeps the House

These types of mortgages have been around for many years (since the late 1970s) and have gone through many changes.

One misconception about these types of loans is that a homeowner loses the house to the bank because of certain terms of such loans when they first came out. In the way way past, banks would take the title to the home.  But that is far from the reality for these types of loans now. The property title remains with the homeowner.

How A Reverse Mortgage Limit Is Set

The amount of money that a homeowner gets is based on current age, life expectancy, and appraised value.  With this information, the bank will determine the credit line or limit that the homeowner can tap.  The lender will apply an interest rate to the amounts outstanding and add it to the balance owed (and subtract the interest accrued from the amount of credit line that is available).  Eventually, when the homeowner dies or moves out of the home then the lender will require repayment.

The total amount that is owed is capped as a percentage of the property value which is assumed to appreciate at a certain rate during the owner’s life expectancy.

A homeowner can move out and sell the property and keep the proceeds above whatever the payoff amount is.  If the homeowner dies and the property passes to his estate, his heirs can sell the property or refinance it and keep it.

The cost for such a loan can be pricey.  Even with recent administrative changes reducing origination fees from the standard 2% of the loan amount, these loans can cost upwards of $12,000 for a $250,000 or $300,000 credit line amount.  Although traditional credit and income underwriting are not required, all the other costs associated with a closing like title work, title insurance, recording fees, mortgage insurance and underwriting are still needed.

Why Would A Homeowner Consider A Reverse Mortgage? Comparing Some Options

Why would a homeowner opt for this? Let’s face it.  Most folks would prefer not to move into an assisted living facility or a nursing home if they can avoid it. So a reverse mortgage is a good option for those who want to age in place in their home.

It provides a cash flow to help support the costs of running the house. And it taps the equity that a homeowner has built up over time that can be used to pay for essentials like medicine or home renovations to make the home safe and useful for an aging homeowner.

Yes, home equity lines or loans are also an option.  They can be even cheaper certainly on the origination side since so many banks offer them with no closing costs.  But the homeowner must make a payment each month even if it is just the interest only that is typically required for the first five or 10 years of the line.  And if the owner doesn’t have the cash to make that payment, then there is the risk of a foreclosure.

As a former mortgage banker, I would see situations where an elder couple would call me after having refinanced the loan several times. Each time they had to incur closing costs and because their income or credit may have slipped they would only qualify for more costly loan terms that could put them at greater risk of losing the house down the road.

Downsides for A Reverse Mortgage

Setting up a reverse mortgage as a line of credit will not jeopardize Social Security benefits and is not counted as an income source for tax purposes. On the other hand, if the homeowner is receiving Medicaid, then it could be counted as an assessable asset that may limit qualification for such benefits.

Some folks who are facing bankruptcy have opted to go the reverse mortgage route.  Jesse Redlener and David Burbridge, attorneys who specialize in these matters, told me of the case where a couple transferred the title from joint ownership (husband and wife) to just the wife.  Then they completed the reverse mortgage process.  And the husband who now owned no other property filed for bankruptcy.  The courts considered this a fraudulent transfer of the property and the assets available for the credit line now became eligible to pay off the husband’s other creditors.

Get More Information From Your Planning Team

The bottom line here is that before making a serious money move you really need to bring in the professionals to help navigate through the minefield.  Actions have consequences and this is an area where a good team of advisers (banker, financial planner, attorney) can help.

For more information on reverse mortgages, you may want to call Bob Irving of First Integrity Mortgage, LLC, a licensed reverse mortgage originator.

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